#CareerAdvice from a friend

My friend Steve Jones posted a couple of career-oriented articles on his ‘blog that caught my attention, and I figured they’d be helpful for people possibly looking to make career adjustments. I thought they were worth passing along.

First, Steve talks about job satisfaction. Is your job or career fulfilling to you? Do you enjoy working a hundred hours a week, or would you rather work fewer hours for less pay but manage to balance your work and your life? While Steve’s article doesn’t necessarily answer those questions outright, it does make you think, and I think a number of people can benefit from his thoughts.

Second, he also mentions an offer by Andy Leonard. In an effort to help those who are recently jobless due to the COVID-19 crisis, he is offering free training to those who have lost their jobs. The courses are about SSIS, and you need to email Andy directly to register for the courses (follow the instructions on his ‘blog article).

In that same spirit, while I don’t have wide course offerings I can give, I can provide a link to my online presentation about ‘blogging that I did back in January. I hope you find it helpful.

Installing #SQLServer 2019 Developer on my laptop

A while back, I wrote about installing SQL Server 2016 on my laptop. Since then, Microsoft has released SQL Server 2019. Additionally, I bought a new laptop last November; my tired old HP 4430s had served me well for several years, but it was showing its age, so I decided it was time to upgrade. Since we have updated versions of SQL Server, and I have a (still relatively) new laptop on which to install it, not to mention that I have some time with this COVID-19 isolation, I figured this would be a good time to install SQL Server 2019 on my new laptop.

Before we begin, let me start with my laptop specs. I make no claims that these are the recommended specs for SQL Server, but this is what I have.

  • HP Pavilion x360 Convertible 14m-dh1xxx
  • Intel Core i5-10210U @ 160 GHz
  • 8 GB RAM
  • Windows 10 Home Edition (it’s what came installed)
  • 129GB available disk space

I started by going to the SQL Server downloads page and downloaded the freeware version of SQL Server 2019 Developer. There are a number of versions on this page, including (among other things) a trial version of SQL Server 2019 on-premises and SQL Server 2019 on Azure (and, of course, the Express version of SQL Server). For my rather modest needs, which includes practicing SQL Server skills, writing about it from time to time, and having some fun with it, Developer version should suit my needs.

The link downloaded SQL2019-SSEI-Dev.exe to my machine. I ran the file and was greeted by a screen asking for the installation type.

I decided to use the Custom option. The lazy body in me thought about running the Basic installation type, but since I’m documenting this installation, I figured it would defeat part of the purpose.

The next screen asked where to download the media. By default, it goes to C:\SQL2019. Since most everything I download goes to my Downloads folder, I decided to switch it there. I set it to download to a SQL2019 folder within my Downloads folder. It also indicated that I would need 8.9GB free space, with a download size of 1.4GB. My new laptop doesn’t have the disk size that my old one did, but I still have plenty available, so it shouldn’t be a problem. (One thing I should note: my new laptop uses a SSD, as opposed to the traditional storage disk on my old machine.)

I clicked Install, and the install package started to download.

Once the Installer finished downloading, the SQL Server Installation Center appeared.

I ran the System Configuration Checker, and it came up cleanly. I decided to proceed with installation. I clicked the Installation tab and selected New SQL Server stand-alone installation or add features to an existing installation.

On the Product Key page, I selected Developer under free edition. The next few screens were straightforward — the only warning I saw was for my firewall — until it got to the Feature Selection screen. I went ahead and selected all features, which would take up 14GB of disk space. If you’re installing SQL Server on your own machine, you’ll need to decide what features you want to install at this point.

I went with the default instance for the instance configuration.

I selected standalone PolyBase-enabled instance. I’m using this on a standalone configuration, after all.

Since I don’t have Java installed on my machine, I used the Open JRE included with the installation. If you have Java on your machine, you’ll need to determine what instance of Java you want to use.

Under Server Configuration, I used the default service accounts. There’s a note that reads: “Microsoft recommends that you use a separate account for each SQL Server service.” I am not sure about the implications of using the default service accounts; this would be a question for someone who knows more about SQL Server than I do.

Under the Database Engine Configuration, I went with Windows authentication mode. If I was installing this under any configuration other than my own machine and login, I would not go with this option; I would use Mixed Mode and specify a SQL user account. I added myself (clicking Add Current User) as the administrator for this account. Again, this is not something I, personally, would recommend for a large-scale installation, but since I’m the only one who’ll be using this instance, and I have no intention of using this for anything other than demo, practice, and documentation purposes, I went ahead and used Windows Authentication.

I pretty much went with the defaults for the rest of the installation. I did need to consent to install R and Python. I got to the Ready to Install screen, clicked Install, and let it do its thing.

Installation was straightforward and painless. In years and installations past, I’d be writing about the errors that came up and the number of times I’d have to click or press Enter to continue with the installation, but there were no such prompts. I let it go and went off to do other things. I’m not sure how long it took — I’ll guess around twenty minutes, although it seemed longer — but when I looked again, SQL Server was installed on my laptop.

That was as far as I got for this installation. I still need to tinker with post-installation configurations, including SSMS, SSIS, and any tools that I need to actually do something with SQL Server. That’ll likely come later when I have a chance to tinker some more.

The #Coronavirus chronicles, part 2: The work-at-home environment #COVID19

Several years ago, I had a job for a virtual company. There was no brick-and-mortar location; the entire job was work-from-home. To accommodate myself for the position, I went out and bought a new, comfortable office chair. If I was going to work-from-home, I wanted to make sure I was comfortable. I made sure my home office setup was one that I could deal with over the course of the position.

Several years later (present-day), I’m working a position where I am able to work from home, although I much prefer going into the office. I have a comfortable desk setup and two monitors. I’ve adapted it to my preferences, and it’s an environment I enjoy and in which I’m productive.

Before COVID-19, my work-at-home setup was me sitting in my living room recliner with the TV on in front of me. I didn’t do it all that often, but for the few times that I worked from home, it wasn’t a big issue.

That changed with COVID-19. It took me a little while, but I realized that I was being unproductive. There were too many distractions. My work environment was uncomfortable… or, more accurately, it was too comfortable. I was picking up bad habits. I was watching TV more than I was concentrating on my work. I wasn’t concentrating on what I was doing.

It took me a while — about a week — before I realized what I was doing. It’s like the situation where you’re working on something and you start zoning out, completely unaware that you’re doing it.

When I came to that realization — today — I realized that I had to change my setup. I cleared out some space in my home office (I hadn’t been making much use of it, other than for my personal non-work laptop), put my work laptop on my desk, and started working. The difference was night and day. I was suddenly focused on my work again. My thought processes were better. I wasn’t sinking into my chair the way I was with my recliner. And I don’t have the TV to distract me.

Granted, I’m still not in a completely ideal environment. My desk (and my entire home office) is cluttered, so there isn’t a lot of room to work. Subsequently, I am working entirely off my laptop, as opposed to having a monitor, mouse, and keyboard with which I’m comfortable. That should come along as I get reacquainted at my work-at-home office space. Getting a new monitor setup and clearing out my home office has soared up my priority list. But to be able to work and be productive again is well worth the change.

The #Coronavirus chronicles, part 1 #COVID19

Quarantine: How to prepare to isolate due to possible coronavirus ...

I’ll admit that I haven’t been doing a very good job of staying on top of my ‘blog lately. This is an article I’ve tried to start several times during the past couple of weeks of confinement, but I’ve fallen into some bad habits during this ordeal. I won’t get into them right now; it’s not a subject I care to delve into, although I might write about it another time (there’s a reason why I’m titling this article “part 1;” I suspect this won’t be my first article about COVID-19).

I suppose a good way to start this article is the start of my personal COVID-19 experience. The crisis hit home for me when this news bit appeared. I play the piano for OLA, so of course, I was there. Upon hearing about this, I immediately left my office for home, where I self-quarantined until this past Sunday.

Even after my quarantine period expired, however, I didn’t really leave home. I haven’t had much reason to do so. My office is closed through at least April (thankfully, I have the ability to work from home). The Albany Catholic diocese has shut down churches, so I have no reason to go on Sunday mornings (disclosure: I am not Catholic; I only go because I play the piano for a Catholic church on Sundays). My gym is closed, and the band I play in is shut down until further notice. Even if I can go anywhere, I don’t have any place to go.

A number of my events have been affected. SQL Saturday Philadelphia and a concert I was supposed to play with my band have been canceled. I was supported to go to Chicago for another SQL Saturday a couple of weeks ago, but that’s now been postponed, if it ends up happening at all.

As of right now, I don’t have anything of note to write about. My days at home are spent writing documentation, watching TV, and playing Xbox (in case you’re wondering, my main Xbox addiction is EA Sports NCAA Football). There are a lot of other things I can and probably should be doing during our period of confinement, including (but not limited to) spending more quality time with my wife, taking advantage of the time to learn things, and work out. I wish I could tell you that I’ve had a great revelation during my time in isolation, but that moment hasn’t happened yet. When it does, I’ll make sure I write about it.

Image may contain: Raymond J Kim, beard, possible text that says 'KEEP CALM AND CARRY ON WAYWARD SON'
Some advice to myself (and maybe you) as we experience this crisis.

So for now, the main reason for this article is to let my regular readers (both of you) know that I’m still alive. I’ll try to get better about writing any insights I might have. Until then, carry on (my wayward son)…

Chicago #SQLSaturday postponed until August 15 #SQLSat945

I was hoping to post a ‘blog article saying that I’ll be presenting in Chicago a week from Saturday, but alas, that is not going to happen. Yesterday, I got the news that, due to the COVID-19 crisis, SQL Saturday Chicago is postponed until August 15.

I am not yet 100% sure whether or not I will be able to travel to Chicago on the new date. I am looking into it, and it does look favorable. For the time being, I’ll say that I’m still speaking in Chicago, but let me check on travel plans and make sure I can swing the new date.

So, no SQL Saturday for me for next weekend. Hopefully, I’ll see people in Chicago on August 15.

It ain’t sexy, but it’s critical

Evacuated Highway 401 Color.jpg
(Photo credit: By Kenny Louie, CC BY 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=10535248)

Think, for a moment, about things that are never talked about — I don’t mean taboo topics, but rather, things that are boring, “ain’t sexy,” and so on — yet are absolutely critical if we want to maintain or move ahead our current standing. Off the top of my head, infrastructure and chores come to mind. Road construction, transportation infrastructure, and public utilities aren’t exactly exciting topics that are discussed over drinks, but maintaining them is absolutely critical if we want to keep our society moving. Likewise, nobody talks about housework, taking out the trash, fixing leaks, replacing appliances, and so forth, but it’s necessary if you want to maintain your home.

Documentation falls under this category. Let’s face it: the large majority of developers, analysts, and other business and technical professionals don’t enjoy writing documentation. Raise your hand if you’re passionate about documentation. (You, yes you, the technical writer in the back row, put your hand down. I’ll get to you in a moment.) But the fact is, documentation is absolutely critical if you want to keep your business afloat.

I was thinking about this not long ago, when I was describing aspects of my job to someone. I’m currently working on an important documentation project (a standard operating procedure document — SOP, for short), and I’ll admit that it isn’t the most exciting project. It isn’t unusual for me to zone out in the afternoon while I’m working on this thing. I was asked, is it an issue with your department or your company? I said no. It’s the nature of the beast. It would be like this regardless of where it was, whether it was with my current team, my current employer, or somewhere else.

No, working on the document is not exciting work. But it’s an important document that needs to be written. It’s a job that (almost) nobody wants. But it’s also a skill that I’m good at doing (or at least I like to think that I am). And it keeps me employed.

I’ve written before that documentation is one of the most disrespected technical tasks. But it’s a critical task if you want your business to stay afloat. You need to be able to pass information along to your colleagues, your employees, and your clients. Documentation is probably the best way to do it. So documentation needs to be clear, understandable, well-written, and presentable.

This is why I preach what I do at SQL Saturday. You ignore documentation at your own risk. No, documentation ain’t sexy. But it’s absolutely critical if you want to keep your business going.

Quarterly Bar Hop at River Street Market, March 18 #NYTechLoop #Networking

CASSUG member Susan Lundberg and our friends at NY Tech Loop are hosting the Quarterly Bar Hop at the River Street Market, 433 River Street, Troy, NY, on Wednesday, March 18, 2020, 5:30-7:30 pm!

Join us and other software professionals for beer, beverages, and networking!

For more information, see http://bit.ly/32JYXKG