Maintain Your Trustworthiness

This is a reblog of an article written by my friend, Steve Jones. I would hope that this is something that goes without saying among data professionals like myself, but I think that it’s important enough that it’s worth repeating (and reblogging).

Voice of the DBA

Many of us that are DBAs and/or sysadmins find ourselves with privileged access to many systems. We can often read the data that’s stored in these systems, whether that’s a relational database, a NoSQL store, or even a mail system. As a result, it is incumbent upon us to be trustworthy and maintain confidentiality with privileged information.

Overall I think most of us do this, but there are always some rogue administrators out there, some of which might take malicious actions. There have been a few people that were arrested or sued for hacking into systems, trashing backups, or causing other issues. Often those are emotional outbursts that disrupt operations, and many people are aware there is an issue. However, what if people weren’t aware they were being hacked in some way?

I ran across this story about some “admin” software being sold on a hacker forum site, which was…

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The importance of maintaining a LinkedIn account

My own presentation and a lightning talk by Paresh Motiwala from our SQL Saturday this past July got me thinking about my own LinkedIn account.  I’ve been going through the activities feed fairly regularly, making sure my ‘blog articles are posted, getting an idea of how many people see (much less, actually read) my articles, and to get occasional updates as to what my contacts are doing.  But it also occurred to me that it’s been a while since I did a full-fledged inventory of my own LinkedIn account.  I’ve written before about the importance of maintaining documentation, and my own LinkedIn profile is no exception.

Why inventory my LinkedIn account?  To answer this, I suppose I should explain why I have a LinkedIn account at all.

I’ll admit that I’m usually a lot more active on LinkedIn if I’m looking for a job.  I don’t know the statistics as to how people use LinkedIn, but it wouldn’t surprise me if job hunting is the number one reason.  Nevertheless, I try to check my LinkedIn fairly regularly, regardless of whether or not I’m looking for new employment.

I should note that, as of this article, I am not actively looking for employment.  That said, I still think it’s important to maintain my LinkedIn account.

Probably my biggest reason for maintaining a LinkedIn account is networking.  I’ve written before about the importance of networking in your professional lifetime.  I have an entire presentation about networking.  LinkedIn provides a tool for maintaining my networking contacts and staying in touch with them.  I’ve often said that one of my main reasons for maintaining my Facebook account is to keep in touch with family and friends, and to keep them up to date with whatever is happening in my life.  LinkedIn mostly serves the same purpose, with the primary difference being that the context is professional, not personal.

If you’re job hunting, a LinkedIn account is invaluable (I would even go as far as to say it’s necessary).  I came across an article (on LinkedIn, of course!) that stated about 85% of jobs were filled through networking.  I can personally attest to this; the person who hired me for my current job is connected to me through both Facebook and LinkedIn.

If you’re not convinced that LinkedIn is necessary for effective job hunting, imagine this scenario.  You’re a hiring manager who’s looking to fill one position, and is looking over two nearly identical resumes.  Both people are qualified for the position.  You decide that you want to know more about them.  You see that one has a LinkedIn profile.  The other does not.  Guess which one will have the advantage.

I’ve seen job applications that ask for your LinkedIn profile URL.  That tells me that employers take LinkedIn pretty seriously.

I said earlier that I am currently not actively seeking new employment.  However, I didn’t mention anything about passively looking.  Although I am content in my current position, I would be remiss if I didn’t keep my eyes and ears open for my next big thing, whether it’s a step up in my position or my salary.

I attended a SQL Saturday presentation by my friend, James Serra, about how to build your career.  One of the takeaways from his presentation was not to get comfortable if you want to get ahead — a point that prompted me to write about it in another ‘blog article.  Granted, I enjoy what I do, and I’m sure I could remain in my position for some time, but I’d be crazy to pass up an opportunity that represents a major step up and is right up my alley.

So, I started going through my own LinkedIn profile.  First, I went through my contacts to make sure it was up-to-date.  I started by going through the last SQL Saturday schedule, looking through the speaker profiles to see who else had LinkedIn accounts (those who have one are noted by a LinkedIn icon under their names), and checking to make sure I was connected to them.  I should note that I did not do this with all the speakers, but mainly the ones I know reasonably well and with whom I feel comfortable connecting.

Going through the “People you may know” feature, I was surprised to find a number of people whom I know but was not already connected on LinkedIn.  I sent them invitations to connect with me.  As of this article, about ten of them have accepted my invitation within the past week.  More will be coming, I’m sure.

I also looked at my own summary and realized that it’s not really a “summary” — that is, it should be a list of highlights and fairly easy to read.  I have some ideas in my head as to how to rewrite it; I have not yet done so as of this article.  Nevertheless, my personal professional summary will definitely get some tweaking sometime in the days ahead.

Whenever I assemble a new presentation, I make sure that it is listed under my Publications section.  It indicates that I am active with my presentations.  Demonstrating that you are doing something to enhance your background (in this case, staying active with my SQL Saturday presentations) is always a good thing.

I also solicit recommendations from people.  Maintaining recommendations on your LinkedIn enhances your profile.  And I make it a point to reciprocate when someone leaves me a recommendation.  This is a key point of networking; networking is a two-way street.  If someone does you a favor, make sure you do the same.

Maintaining LinkedIn is critical for your professional career.  I only talked about a few reasons for maintaining your account; there are many more that I didn’t mention.  (Out of curiosity, I Google-searched “reasons to maintain linkedin account” and a number of links showed up.)  In this day and age where maintaining an online presence is nearly expected, LinkedIn might make the difference in advancing your career.

SQL Saturday #797, Boston, Sept. 22

I received word this week that I’ve been selected to speak at SQL Saturday #797, Boston, MA (more accurately, Burlington, MA) on September 22!  This is the third time I’ve applied to speak at Boston, and the first time I’ve been selected.  I suppose the third time’s a charm!

I will be doing a brand-new presentation (that made its debut in Albany last weekend): “Networking 101: Building professional relationships” (formerly named “Networking: it isn’t just for breakfast anymore”).  This is an interactive session in which we will discuss networking — what it is, and why it’s important.  You’ll even have a chance to practice networking within the confines of our room!

Mark your calendars, and I hope to see you in Burlington, MA on September 22!

SQL Saturday #741 Albany — the debrief

Once again, we had another great SQL Saturday here in Albany this past weekend!  I don’t know how many people attended, but by my estimate, we had well over two-hundred people.  I had a great time (as usual), and it serves to remind me why this is one of my favorite events.

My own presentation went very well!  I had nine people attend my session.  Two people (not including myself) were in the room when I started, but more people started filing in after I began my presentation.  Everyone I spoke with told me it was a great presentation, and I got nothing but positive feedback!

I did, however, get one piece of feedback that I did not expect.  I spoke with a number of people who did not attend my presentation, and one who almost skipped it (but ended up coming, anyway).  They all told me the same thing: they read my presentation title and automatically assumed that my talk was about computer networking, not business networking.  Had they known that, they all told me, they would have been there.  So I missed out on a potentially larger audience, simply because of my presentation title.

My initial reaction was frustration.  Mt first thought was, “read the presentation abstract, people!”  I didn’t want to change it; I liked the title and thought it was clever (I’d taken it from one of my ‘blog articles with the same name).  At the same time, I also couldn’t ignore the feedback; it’s human nature to judge a book by its cover (or, in the case, the title), and first impressions are important.  So, reluctantly, I renamed my presentation.  At the same time, I also made a slight tweak to my presentation slides; I removed one slide that did not serve much purpose during my presentation.

I’d be remiss if I didn’t mention a great event without talking about other great presentations.  I attended James Serra‘s session on presenting.  I’m always looking to improve upon my own presentation skills, and I got a lot out of James’ presentation (as always).  Not only did I pick up a few new tips, he also reinforced some points that I use in my own presentations.  This is always good to hear; it legitimizes things that I discuss.  I also sat in on a less serious presentation by Thomas Grohser.  At the end of the day, a little humor is a good thing.  James and Thomas are both excellent speakers, and I always recommend them.  I’d also heard great things about a session I’d missed presented by my friend, Deborah Melkin, another wonderful speaker that I highly recommend.

Unfortunately, part of the reason why I missed Deborah’s session (and others) was an issue that needed my attention.  When I arrived at the event site that morning, one of my tires went flat.  I didn’t have the time to address it, and I didn’t feel much like dealing with it, especially on a warm and humid day.  Fortunately, I have a AAA membership.  Let me tell you about how handy that became that afternoon.

Of course, there were also the events around SQL Saturday.  Friday night was the speaker’s dinner.  It was held at a Mediterranean restaurant about ten minutes away from my office.  I’ve driven past this place many times, and had no idea that it was there.  It was a good place, and I’m going to keep it in mind!  The closing and accompanying raffles are always fun.  My wife’s name was actually drawn for a prize!  Unfortunately, she couldn’t claim it, simply because she was not there, and the rules stipulate that you need to be present to win!  (Some people said that I should claim it by proxy, but at the same time, rules are rules!)  The post-event party was held at a place across the street, a great opportunity to mix and mingle with fellow speakers and event volunteers in a loose and casual atmosphere!

All in all, it was a great event!  This is one of my favorite events, and I look forward to doing this again next year!

SQL Saturday #741, Albany, NY — Come to upstate New York!

On Saturday, July 28 (a week from tomorrow as I write this), our local Albany-area SQL user group will host our fifth SQL Saturday!  I have participated in all five; I worked as a volunteer at the first one, and I presented at the other four (including next Saturday).  This is one of my favorite events, and I look forward to it every single year!

This year, I am debuting a brand-new presentation: “Networking: it isn’t just for breakfast anymore,” based upon my ‘blog article of the same name.  (An alternate name for it could be “Networking 101: networking for beginners.”)  This presentation is primarily for people who want to get better at networking but don’t know how to do it, although seasoned veterans might be able to get something out of it as well.  It’s one of the first sessions of the day (8:30 am!), so come early!

As much as I promote my own presentations, mine is not the only one on the docket.  There are many wonderful speakers and presentations being given at this event, and I encourage you to come out and check out as many as you can that interest you!

SQL Saturday is always a great time, a great opportunity for free learning, and a great opportunity to network with data professionals.  The Capital District region here in upstate New York has been my home for many years.  I hope to see you here in my home turf!

Want to get ahead? Don’t get comfortable

“Moving me down the highway, rolling me down the highway, moving ahead so life won’t pass me by…”
— Jim Croce, “I Got A Name”

“It’s important to be able to make mistakes.  If you don’t make mistakes, it means you’re not trying.”
— Wynton Marsalis

“Don’t look back.  Something might be gaining on you.”
— Satchel Paige

“Insanity is doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results.”
— unknown

Late last Friday afternoon, our manager stopped by our workspace for a chat.  Some of it was just small talk, but he also wanted to give us a reminder of something, which is what I want to write about here.  I don’t remember his exact words, but the gist of what he said went something like this.

“We want you to develop personally and professionally,” he said (or something to that effect).  “The way you do that is to take on tasks that you know nothing about.  Volunteer to do things you wouldn’t typically volunteer.  If you see a support ticket, don’t worry about looking to see whether or not you know what it is or if you know how to handle it.  Just take the responsibility.  That’s how you develop.  If you want to move ahead, you need to step out of your comfort zone.”

Indeed, these are words to live by, and it isn’t the first time I’ve heard this.  I have had countless experiences where I’ve been told that I need to step out of my comfort zone in order to improve.  In my music experiences, especially in my ensemble performance experience, I’ve often been told by good music directors that I need to attempt playing challenging passages to get better.  When I first started doing CrossFit, one question we were asked was, “would you rather be comfortable or uncomfortable?”  The point was that in order to get better, some discomfort would be involved.  I also remember one of the points of emphasis back when I took a Dale Carnegie course; each week would involve stepping a little more out of our comfort zone.  We would do this gradually each week until we reached a point where we had drastically improved from where we had started.

Falling into a rut is common, and while it happens in all different facets of life, it is especially easy to do in the workplace.  Sometimes, the work environment can slow down, and you have a tendency to fall into a routine.  I’ve had this happen more often than I want to admit, and more often than not, I’m not even aware that I’m doing it.  Every once in a while, a pep talk or some kind of a jolt (such as a kick in the butt — whether it’s from someone else or myself) reminds me that I need to branch out and try new things if I want to get (and stay) ahead.  I am well-aware that I need to step out of my comfort zone to get ahead, but I am also the first to admit that I will sometimes forget about this, myself.

Too often, I see people who fall into ruts themselves, and who have no desire to step out of their comfort zones.  As much as I try to tell these people to at least try to do something about it, they insist on remaining where they are.  These people strive for mediocrity, which is a major pet peeve of mine, and something for which I have no tolerance or respect.  People want to remain in their “happy place,” but what I don’t understand is how these same expect to get ahead, yet refuse to leave their comfort zones to do it.  These people will be stuck in a rut forever, and they have no right to complain about it.

Everyone has a dream, or at least some kind of goal they want to achieve.  The fact is, if you want to reach that goal, or at least take steps toward it (whether you reach it or not), you need to get uncomfortable to do it.

#BI101: Some SQL Saturday speakers to check out

This is part of a series of articles in which I’m trying to teach myself about BI.  Any related articles I write are preceded with “#BI101” in the title.

As a speaker on the SQL Saturday circuit, I’ve had the honor and privilege of having met, connected with, and even befriended a number of experts in SQL, data, and BI.  If you can get to get to a SQL Saturday, you can also have that opportunity.

In a couple of weeks (July 28), we will be hosting SQL Saturday here in Albany, NY.  I was going through the schedule, and noticed a number of speakers on the docket who will be talking about various BI topics.  I’ve attended a lot of their sessions, and I recommend these speakers highly!

(Note: for purposes of this article, I am limiting this list to BI topics, although these speakers may be giving other presentations as well.)

SQL Saturday is a great free learning resource, a great opportunity to network, and is always a good time!  If you’re looking to learn about BI or other data-related or professional topics, go check out a SQL Saturday event near you!