Enemies and adversaries

I stumbled across this article today. I won’t get into the politics behind it (those of you who know me know how much I despise politics), but I wanted to write about it because of a quote by one of the perpetrators I read in the article — one that I found to be extremely disturbing.

The quote: “We need to hit the enemy in the mouth.”

When one political side — any side — refers to the other as “the enemy,” we have a major problem.

Most of the time, when I use the word “enemy” (and I’ll admit that I might use it occasionally), I use it tongue-in-cheek. As a sports fan, I’ll sometimes jokingly refer to our archrival as “the enemy.” But I also keep things in context. At the end of the day, it’s still just a game.

That wasn’t the case here. The perpetrators used it maliciously, with intent to harm. It became a matter of life and death. This is how wars and armed standoffs happen.

I do remember one point during the presidential elections in 1996, when Bob Dole talked about his contentious campaign against Bill Clinton, when Dole said, “we are adversaries. We are not enemies.”

Like everyone else, I have my own perspective of the world. As such, I have my own biases. I’m a registered Democrat, yet I have many friends — including many whom I love dearly — who are Republican. Heck, I’m a Yankee fan whose wife is a Red Sox fan. I was born and raised in the US, yet I embrace cultural differences; indeed, I have an appreciation for environments, traditions, mores, and foods that are not my own. I encourage people to send me good karma, to pray for me, to send me a Mazeltov or a Barakallahu fiikum (I hope I used that context correctly), or whatever best wishes their culture or tradition dictates. Not only would I not be offended, I’m actually flattered that you would think enough of me that you would offer me best wishes from the standpoint of your own culture.

Conflict is everywhere. We as humans will never completely agree with everyone else (nor should we). Conflict is important; it allows us to see things more critically, and it’s an important source of feedback. By using conflict productively, anything and everything we do gets better.

However, if we start thinking about the other side — whatever the “other side” is — as the “enemy,” then we’ve just crossed the line. We reach the point where we are intolerant of other opinions and viewpoints — enough that we’d be willing to cause harm to the others with differing views. And in my mind, that is unacceptable.

Everyone sees things differently. While I think it might be too much to ask to embrace opposing views, at least understand the perspective from the other side. When we understand views from the other side, we can hammer out our differences and come to a better resolution.

Heading graphics: it’s not just about good looks

I’ve been building Confluence pages as my initial projects for my (still-relatively) new employer. I’ve been building landing pages, coming up with designs and layouts as I go along.

For a couple of these pages, I wanted to come up with graphics — not just to be aesthetically pleasing, but also to give each page an identity. That way, someone visiting them can quickly and easily discern that that’s the employee resources page, or the architecture team page, or whatever page it is.

I’ve said before — and this is something that I preach as a technical communicator — that reading is work. It takes effort to read a piece of text and to comprehend it. If I’m writing a step-by-step guide, my rule of thumb is, if a step takes longer than a few seconds to understand, it has failed and must be rewritten.

Have you ever read a long piece of text (that isn’t a book you’re reading for fun) and realized how mentally tired you felt after reading it? For that matter, do you even want to read such a long piece of text? There’s a reason why people never read terms and conditions that come with applications. Take a look at all that black text, and tell me if you really want to read through it.

On that same note, it’s been often said — and it’s true — that a picture is worth a thousand words. A graphic will often convey information that’s often difficult to put into words.

Some logos are so recognizable that they are iconic: Apple, Coca Cola, Nike, Amazon, and the list goes on. If you come across a web page with one of these logos, you’ll almost instantly recognize what the page is about.

Even when I write these ‘blog articles, I try to choose graphics that are illustrative of what I’m writing.

That’s what I’m after with these Confluence pages that I’m building (they’re internal to the company, so I’m somewhat hesitant about showing them off). An employee can take a quick look at the page and know that (s)he is in the right place.

Granted, heading graphics aren’t always appropriate for every document (resumes, anyone?). However, if they’re used effectively, they can add a lot to a document and maybe even make it easier to read. Good graphics aren’t always about making something pretty; it can sometimes, in and of itself, convey a message.

Data Geeks Saturday, August 7 — I’m speaking! #SQLSaturday #DataSaturday

My speaker train continues to roll. I will be speaking at Data Geeks Saturday on August 7. This is another virtual conference, so I will be presenting from my home office (the conference itself is being run by the South Florida Data Geeks).

For the second straight conference, I will be presenting my networking session (the same one that I presented at LA SQL Saturday back in June). So if you missed it in June (or just want to see it again), come join me on August 7!

Go to the Data Geeks Saturday site to register. Note: unlike other events, this conference is not free; there is a charge to attend. The earlier you register, the lower the cost!

Click here to see the full list of speakers and sessions!

Hope to see you on August 7!

The things we do for free stuff

This morning, I’ll be sitting in on a 10:00 webinar by some company called 36Software. I have no idea what the webinar is about, and since I’ll be working during the webinar, I’ll be sitting in my home office working on documentation with the webinar on in the background.

Why am I sitting in on this webinar? The title of it says it all: “36Software Wants to Send you to STC Summit 2022 in Chicago!”

I joined (or, more accurately, rejoined) STC last year. I had been a member years ago when I was working as a full-time technical writer, but I moved on to other things, and I let my membership lapse. Last year, during my unemployment and my search for technical writer positions, I decided it was worth it to rejoin. It’s an organization that can help me with my endeavors, and, I figured, it looks good on my resume.

What held me up from doing so for so long is that, unlike PASS membership, STC is not free. The lowest-tiered annual membership level is somewhere in the ballpark of around $200, and I wasn’t sure if it was worth the investment. Now that I am, once again, a full-time technical writer, I decided that it was. (I was also awarded a grant that allowed me to cover the cost.) Now that I’m working again (and in a field directly related to the organization), I have little trepidation about paying the $200 annual membership dues.

But, back to the webinar. I’ll admit that sitting in on this webinar isn’t really something that’s high on my priority list for the day, but as the saying goes, nothing in life is free. And so-called “free stuff” is no exception. There are all types of things that say they’re “free,” but there’s always some kind of trade-off. When they say “free,” they are usually talking about money. Usually, you end up paying in other ways, and not necessarily with money.

STC Summit is an event that I would love to attend. I’ve attended PASS Summit twice, and I found it to be a great experience. I think STC Summit would be similar. However, there are costs involved: the registration fee, airfare, and accommodations being the biggest ones. These are not cheap, and they usually preclude people, myself included, from attending.

I had said that the only way I’d be able to attend PASS Summit was if I was selected to speak at one. Lo and behold, it happened! Being selected to speak waived the registration fee, and I was able to attend! Of course, it wasn’t entirely “free” — I was put to work, after all, by serving as a speaker!

Those of you who attend SQL Saturday know about the sponsors and vendors, all of whom are integral to user groups and conferences such as SQL Saturday. They’ll have their booths set up, advertising their products and services. They’ll have door prizes — expensive electronic toys such as Xboxes, free software, gift cards, etc. — that they’ll raffle off at the end of the event. Of course, there’s a catch: in order to be eligible for prizes, you need to submit your name and email to each vendor, after which you’ll be inundated with emails from that vendor.

It’s been said that “free” isn’t “free.” Sure, you might not be paying for something with money, but money isn’t always used to pay for things. Are you willing to pay a cost in terms of your time or your email? It often depends on the product and the cost. I often am unable to pay for a product I’d like out of my bank account, but I’m sometimes willing to pay with my time or my bandwidth. Hey, for an opportunity to attend a conference whose registration fee will likely cost over a thousand dollars, sure, I’ll take an hour to sit in on a webinar.

Improvement through rewriting

If you’re an application developer (or at least you used to be one, like me), how many times have you come across an old piece of code that you wrote and said to yourself, “what the f*%k was I thinking?!?” You say to yourself, I can write that much better now than I did back then, and your instinct is go back and change everything that you’d previously written.

The same holds true for documentation. I recently had an experience that reminded me of that.

I was updating my slide deck for my upcoming SQL Saturday talk this Saturday. I thought my slides were in pretty good shape, but I wanted to go through them to ensure that everything was still fresh and up-to-date. Besides, the organizers at SQL/Data Saturday LA sent me a link to their PowerPoint template, and I figured that I should use it for my slide deck for Saturday.

Indeed, when I went through my slide deck, I was hit with a case of “what the hell was I thinking?” Many of my statements and references were outdated. I found that I could rewrite much of what I’d originally written, making them more efficient and readable. Some items were unnecessary, and I eliminated them altogether.

I spent a couple of days rewriting my slides. When I was finished, I discovered that I liked the new slides much better than my old ones. I took the new slides and made some minor modifications (mainly removing the SQL Saturday LA branding so that it was more generic). If you’d like to see them, you can download them from my Presentations page.

So the moral of the story is, no matter how good you think something is, it can always be better. Don’t be afraid to review and edit something you’ve created. You might find that you like your new version even better.

(P.S. check out my presentation this Saturday!)

Reminder: I’m speaking this Saturday! #SQLSaturday #DataSaturday #SQLSatLA #Networking

This is a reminder that I will be speaking this upcoming Saturday, June 12!

I am speaking at SQL Saturday Los Angeles. I will do my presentation titled: Networking 101: Building professional relationships.

I am scheduled to present at 4 pm EDT (1 pm PDT). This is a virtual conference, so I will be speaking to you from the comfort of my home office in upstate New York. As much as I’d love to travel to LA, I’m sorry to say that I won’t physically be on the West coast on Saturday! (Perhaps I’ll make it out there at some point — especially now that my new employer is located out there — but it won’t be this weekend!)

Anyone can attend the conference (you don’t have to be a data geek!), but you must register to do so. The event is free! Use their Eventbrite link to register!

Hope to see you (virtually) this Saturday!

June CASSUG Monthly Meeting #Networking @CASSUG_Albany

Our June meeting will again be online. NOTE: you MUST RSVP to this Meetup at https://www.meetup.com/Capital-Area-SQL-Server-User-Group/events/278702859/ to view the Zoom URL!

Our June guest speaker is Vasiya Krishnan!

Topic: SQL Database at the Edge

Our online meeting schedule is as follows:

6:00: General chat, discussion, and announcements
6:30: Presentation
We usually wrap up between 7:30 PM and 8:00 PM.

Please RSVP to this Meetup using the above link, then use the online Zoom event URL to join (note: you MUST RSVP for the URL to be visible). We will send out a meeting password as we get closer to the event.

Thanks to our sponsor, Datto, for making this event possible!

Upcoming speaking engagements (as of 5/27/2021) #SQLSaturday #DataSaturday #PASSSummit

It seems like it’s been quite some time since I posted about my upcoming speaking engagements, but I do have one coming up!

Confirmed

  • On Saturday, June 12, I will be speaking at SQL Saturday Los Angeles. I am scheduled to speak at 4:00 pm Eastern (1:00 pm LA local/Pacific). This is a virtual event, so I will be presenting from my home office in upstate New York; I will not be flying out to California for this conference!

    I will do my presentation titled: “Networking 101: Building professional relationships.” I will talk about business/professional networking: what it is, how to do it, ways to break the ice, and where to find networking opportunities. This is an interactive session (although I’ll admit that the “interactive” part works better when I do this session in-person rather than virtually), so you might even get a chance to practice networking during this presentation!

    Anyone is welcome to attend; however, you do need to register. Follow the instructions on the SQL Saturday LA site to register for the event!

Applied, but not confirmed

I’ve applied to speak at a couple of other events, but I don’t know whether or not I’ll be speaking at either of them. Stay tuned.

  • November 8-12: PASS Data Community Summit. This online event is the successor to PASS Summit! I also submitted three presentations (so far) to this event. We’ll see whether or not I’m chosen!

    And if you’re interested in speaking at this event, the call for speakers is now open! If you’re interested in speaking at this event, you are encouraged to apply!

As always, I’ll mention any speaking engagements that I have coming up. Hopefully, as we emerge from the pandemic, I’ll be speaking at some in-person events, rather than doing so over Zoom. Hope to see you at an event sometime soon!

I’ve landed!

After 388 days, 557 submitted resumes, and countless rejections, I’m happy to report that I have landed!

I have accepted a position for Insight Global. I will be working remotely as a technical writer for their client, PlutoTV! I start my new gig in a few weeks, depending on how long it will take for them to configure and send me my new work laptop!

I have made no secret about how stressful this job search has been, and I even talk about it in my job hunt presentation. Indeed, an entire calendar year is a long time to be without gainful employment, and it is the longest that I have ever gone without regular work. But I persevered and survived it, and I’m very much looking forward to this new opportunity!

Thanks to all of you who have followed my exploits and supported me!

#PASS is dead. Long live PASS!

Many data professionals, myself included, were saddened back in January when PASS ceased operations. As I’ve mentioned before, PASS provided me with many professional opportunities that I didn’t think were possible. It enhanced my career and provided me with countless networking opportunities. I made many friends during my association with PASS that otherwise wouldn’t have been possible. Believe me, #SQLFamily is a real thing!

Redgate picked up the ball that had been carried by PASS. They have been hard at work resurrecting the community that PASS had built.

I was happy to see that the PASS brand has been rebooted in a couple of ways: PASS Data Community Summit and the resurrection of SQL Saturday.

I wrote earlier that I’d been chosen to speak at Data Saturday LA. However, I did not see the link on the DataSaturdays site. It turns out that the link is listed under SQL Saturday.

The new SQL Saturday site includes links to all the previous SQL Saturday events that were hosted by PASS. I was happy to see that all the previous events appear to be listed. With that, I plan to update my old presentation links to point to the newly-listed (old-listed?) events. (I see a lot of work ahead of me!)

One question I have is what will happen between SQL Saturday and Data Saturday? Will they remain two different entities, or will they merge? I am not privy to that level of administration, so I have no idea.

The new SQL Saturday and PASS Data Community Summit links still need work, but I’m happy that Redgate has been putting in the work to restructure the brand and the community. Great work, Redgate! Bravo! I am very much looking forward to seeing how Redgate proceeds with the updated community.

Edit/correction: as it turns out, there is actually a board, of which Steve Jones is a part, that actually does the work on the new SQL Saturday initiative. While Redgate sponsors it (their branding is all over it), it’s the board that actually does the work. Nice job, board!