Is Your DR Plan Complete?

Here’s another article reblog, this time from my friend, Andy Levy. Disaster recovery is a big deal, and you need to make sure that you’re prepared.

Don’t think a disaster can’t happen to you? Well, it happened to me.

The Rest is Just Code

Kevin Hill (b|t) posted a thought-provoking item on his last week about Disaster Recovery Plans. While I am in the 10% who perform DR tests for basic functionality on a regular basis, there’s a lot more to being prepared for disaster than just making sure you can get the databases back online.

You really need to have a full-company business continuity plan (BCP), which your DR plan is an integral portion of. Here come the Boy Scouts chanting “Be Prepared!”

When disaster strikes:

  • How will you communicate it to your customers, including regular status updates?
  • How will you communicate within the company?
  • Do you have your systems prioritized so that you know what order things have to be brought online? Which systems can lag by a day or two while you get the most critical things online?
  • Do you have contingency plans for all of…

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The importance of maintaining a LinkedIn account

My own presentation and a lightning talk by Paresh Motiwala from our SQL Saturday this past July got me thinking about my own LinkedIn account.  I’ve been going through the activities feed fairly regularly, making sure my ‘blog articles are posted, getting an idea of how many people see (much less, actually read) my articles, and to get occasional updates as to what my contacts are doing.  But it also occurred to me that it’s been a while since I did a full-fledged inventory of my own LinkedIn account.  I’ve written before about the importance of maintaining documentation, and my own LinkedIn profile is no exception.

Why inventory my LinkedIn account?  To answer this, I suppose I should explain why I have a LinkedIn account at all.

I’ll admit that I’m usually a lot more active on LinkedIn if I’m looking for a job.  I don’t know the statistics as to how people use LinkedIn, but it wouldn’t surprise me if job hunting is the number one reason.  Nevertheless, I try to check my LinkedIn fairly regularly, regardless of whether or not I’m looking for new employment.

I should note that, as of this article, I am not actively looking for employment.  That said, I still think it’s important to maintain my LinkedIn account.

Probably my biggest reason for maintaining a LinkedIn account is networking.  I’ve written before about the importance of networking in your professional lifetime.  I have an entire presentation about networking.  LinkedIn provides a tool for maintaining my networking contacts and staying in touch with them.  I’ve often said that one of my main reasons for maintaining my Facebook account is to keep in touch with family and friends, and to keep them up to date with whatever is happening in my life.  LinkedIn mostly serves the same purpose, with the primary difference being that the context is professional, not personal.

If you’re job hunting, a LinkedIn account is invaluable (I would even go as far as to say it’s necessary).  I came across an article (on LinkedIn, of course!) that stated about 85% of jobs were filled through networking.  I can personally attest to this; the person who hired me for my current job is connected to me through both Facebook and LinkedIn.

If you’re not convinced that LinkedIn is necessary for effective job hunting, imagine this scenario.  You’re a hiring manager who’s looking to fill one position, and is looking over two nearly identical resumes.  Both people are qualified for the position.  You decide that you want to know more about them.  You see that one has a LinkedIn profile.  The other does not.  Guess which one will have the advantage.

I’ve seen job applications that ask for your LinkedIn profile URL.  That tells me that employers take LinkedIn pretty seriously.

I said earlier that I am currently not actively seeking new employment.  However, I didn’t mention anything about passively looking.  Although I am content in my current position, I would be remiss if I didn’t keep my eyes and ears open for my next big thing, whether it’s a step up in my position or my salary.

I attended a SQL Saturday presentation by my friend, James Serra, about how to build your career.  One of the takeaways from his presentation was not to get comfortable if you want to get ahead — a point that prompted me to write about it in another ‘blog article.  Granted, I enjoy what I do, and I’m sure I could remain in my position for some time, but I’d be crazy to pass up an opportunity that represents a major step up and is right up my alley.

So, I started going through my own LinkedIn profile.  First, I went through my contacts to make sure it was up-to-date.  I started by going through the last SQL Saturday schedule, looking through the speaker profiles to see who else had LinkedIn accounts (those who have one are noted by a LinkedIn icon under their names), and checking to make sure I was connected to them.  I should note that I did not do this with all the speakers, but mainly the ones I know reasonably well and with whom I feel comfortable connecting.

Going through the “People you may know” feature, I was surprised to find a number of people whom I know but was not already connected on LinkedIn.  I sent them invitations to connect with me.  As of this article, about ten of them have accepted my invitation within the past week.  More will be coming, I’m sure.

I also looked at my own summary and realized that it’s not really a “summary” — that is, it should be a list of highlights and fairly easy to read.  I have some ideas in my head as to how to rewrite it; I have not yet done so as of this article.  Nevertheless, my personal professional summary will definitely get some tweaking sometime in the days ahead.

Whenever I assemble a new presentation, I make sure that it is listed under my Publications section.  It indicates that I am active with my presentations.  Demonstrating that you are doing something to enhance your background (in this case, staying active with my SQL Saturday presentations) is always a good thing.

I also solicit recommendations from people.  Maintaining recommendations on your LinkedIn enhances your profile.  And I make it a point to reciprocate when someone leaves me a recommendation.  This is a key point of networking; networking is a two-way street.  If someone does you a favor, make sure you do the same.

Maintaining LinkedIn is critical for your professional career.  I only talked about a few reasons for maintaining your account; there are many more that I didn’t mention.  (Out of curiosity, I Google-searched “reasons to maintain linkedin account” and a number of links showed up.)  In this day and age where maintaining an online presence is nearly expected, LinkedIn might make the difference in advancing your career.

Better Comments

This is a reblog of a post by my friend, Steve Jones. I’ve often said that commenting code is a form of documentation, and needs to be done more.

Voice of the DBA

I assume most of your comment your code.

Well, you probably comment code most of the time.

I’d bet your comments have quite a bit of detail.

And you do this completely inconsistently.

That’s what I’d think, or maybe just what I want. Even the best developers I know will not consistently comment code. You can drift through any project on Github and see this. Those projects on GitHub might even be better documented because people know they are public. In most corporate environments I have worked in, I’ll find that when people get busy, or distracted, or even when they’re experimenting to find a solution, and they don’t write detailed comments. Usually only when someone fixes a bug, with a solution found quickly, do I get a really useful comment.

There are all sorts of ways that people think about commenting their code. I ran across a post from…

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Document maintenance is critical

I had two appointments this past week.  The first was one for my car to get my oil change and to make sure everything was in good working order (it was).  A couple of days later, I had a dentist appointment.  It was a routine cleaning (I also had a procedure done — one that I’d been putting off for a while).  While the two appointments were for different reasons, they both served the same purpose: to perform maintenance.

Just about everything, especially anything mechanical, is going to break down over time.  Maintenance ensures that things remain in good working order.  But when we think about maintenance, we usually think about car repair, roadwork, furnaces, and water heaters.

I’m sure many people in tech industries consider periodic hardware and software maintenance.  Hardware can break down.  Drives crash occasionally.  CPUs are upgraded to keep pace with emerging technology and to support software.  Speaking of software, bug fixes are constantly made.  There’s also the matter of security; virus software definitions are constantly updated, and operating system patches are distributed to ensure computers are safe.

But here’s another question: when was the last time you maintained your documentation?  Does your documentation, which was written for, say, Version 1.0, reflect what is in Version 2.0?

The trouble with documentation, even the best-written documentation, is that it can become obsolete over time.  Processes and systems change.  Interfaces are redesigned.  Steps become more efficient, or in some cases, even eliminated.  Change happens.  It’s one of the sure things in life.  Documentation should also change as well.  How often has your help desk received calls from frustrated customers saying things like, “your instructions say ‘press the red button,’ but there’s no red button on the interface!”

If your product changes — and it inevitably will — your instructions should change with it.  It’s important that systems are maintained.  Your documentation should be maintained as well.