#SQLSaturday #892 Providence — the debrief #SQLSat892 #SQLFamily

I arrived home last night around 9:15, after driving four hours (including an hour-long dinner break) from Providence, RI. As usual, it was another great SQL Saturday! As always, I had a blast! And as always, I was wiped out after it was over! Even as I write this, on this Sunday afternoon, I had intended to take care of some work around the house, and ended up taking a nap instead. C’est la vie.

So as seems to be tradition lately, here’s my most recent writeup of my most recent SQL Saturday.

I’ll start with something I did before I even left on Friday. I was getting my things organized and packed for my trip. While going through my briefcase, I came across my laptop dongle. I told myself, “most places these days use HDMI video inputs for their projectors. I haven’t needed it yet. So I’ll just leave it here.” I tossed it back in my briefcase, and packed my laptop without the dongle.

I didn’t know it yet, but I had just shot myself in the foot. (Read on, McDuff.)

Image may contain: 18 people, including Raymond J Kim, Ed Pollack and Paresh Motiwala, people smiling, people standing, people sitting and indoor
SQL Saturday speakers at dinner (photo courtesy of Paresh Motiwala)

I checked into my B&B (a cute New England cape house in North Kingstown, RI) and headed to the speaker’s dinner. One of the B&B’s co-owners told me that the restaurant was a former train station. It sat by some very active railroad tracks. Not only was I able to see trains as they went by, I could feel them. Several Amtrak, Acela, and MBTA commuter trains passed by during dinner.

Image may contain: 5 people, including Paresh Motiwala and Raymond J Kim, people smiling, people standing
Of course, it isn’t a SQL Saturday unless Paresh and I go out for ice cream!

My session was scheduled for 10:00 on Saturday. Unfortunately, it didn’t go as smoothly as I would have liked. For starters, I found out that the wrong room was listed on the schedule. I went to an empty room, which surprised me, because I was expecting to walk into the previous session already in progress. It turned out that it was down the hall.

Remember how I said that I shot myself in the foot when I didn’t bring my dongle? Here’s where it raised its ugly head. It turned out that the only projector connections were VGA, which I didn’t have on my laptop. I was not able to find an HDMI adapter. That’s when I resorted to Plan B.

Before every SQL Saturday, I always make it a point to upload my slides to the website. They’re there so that attendees can download them. However, they also serve a secondary purpose: my backup, in case something happens with my laptop. Sure enough, I had to resort to it. I used the desktop computer in the classroom, downloaded my slides, and used that for my presentation. (A thought popped into my head while they were downloading: does the desktop have PowerPoint installed?)

I was angry with myself, because I usually take pride in that I’m always prepared — and on this day, I wasn’t. Note to self: always bring the dongle with you. I made a mistake, and I paid for it by losing ten minutes of my presentation time. I suppose I’ll chalk it up as a learning experience, and remember to pack my dongle for next time.

The presentation otherwise went without a hitch. I did tweak it a bit, per the feedback I received the previous time I’d presented it.

Image may contain: 2 people, including Raymond J Kim, hat and outdoor
I’ve conversed with this gentleman online for years — and finally met him in person for the first time at SQL Saturday!

I was in for a surprise (a pleasant one, this time!) after my presentation. One of the attendees (the gentleman you see in this picture) introduced himself to me after I was done — and when I saw his name tag, I realized immediately who it was! (For privacy reasons, I’m withholding his name.)

I often peruse the forums on SQLServerCentral.com. It’s my go-to forum whenever I have database-related questions. There are a number of people whom I see regularly on the forum, and I interact with them often enough that I consider them friends. The fantasy football league in which I play came from these forums. There is one person with whom I interact regularly on the forums, including fantasy football. He is our league’s defending champion, and as the only two people in the league who have multiple titles, we are rivals. I’ve been conversing with him for year and years. I consider this man a friend.

This weekend, we met face-to-face for the first time! He attended my presentation, and I had no idea that it was him! His attendance totally blew my mind, and it made my day!

Grant Fritchey gave a great presentation about SQL injection. It blew my mind — and not in a good way. Although SQL injection was identified as a security problem in 1997, it still persists as a problem now in 2019. If nothing else, Grant’s presentation reminded me that we still need to be vigilant about fighting code injection, even with all the safeguards we have in place now.

Probably one of my favorite sessions was the last one of the day. Linda Groszyk, who is a relative newcomer to speaking for SQL Saturday, gave a great presentation called Breaking the Social Code: How to be Socially Intelligent at Work. It was a fantastic session about human psychological dynamics that, I think, everyone should be aware of. I was impressed enough by her presentation that I encouraged her to apply to speak at our SQL Saturday in Albany when it rolls around next July, as well as our user group, if she is able to arrange it! (Greg Moore, if you’re reading this, consider this a heads-up!)

Another weekend, another great SQL Saturday in the books! If you are able to make it to one near you, I encourage you to do so!

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This weekend: SQL Saturday, Providence, RI #sqlsat892

This weekend, I will be traveling out to Providence, RI for SQL Saturday #892! It will take place this Saturday, August 24, at New England Institute of Technology in East Greenwich, RI.

I will be doing my (still-relatively) brand-new presentation about ‘blogging! This is my third time speaking at Providence SQL Saturday, and my first time since December, 2017!

Come on out, check out my presentation (as well as a bunch of other good ones), do some networking, and have fun! See you on Saturday!

SQL Saturday #855, Albany — the debrief

This past weekend, we (the CASSUG user group) hosted our sixth SQL Saturday. I’ve attended dozens of SQL Saturdays, but the ones that we hold in my own backyard are always the most special to me. This is one of my favorite events of the entire year, and I look forward to it each summer.

At the speaker’s dinner on Friday night!

I’ll start by talking about my own presentations, which took place in the afternoon (I was scheduled for the last two time slots of the day). My first talk was a lightning talk about business cards. (If you want to know about what I presented, check out my ‘blog article — it pretty much outlines what I talked about.) Mine was one of seven talks, along with talks by Bryan Cafferky, Andy Yun, Deborah Melkin, Michelle Gutzait, Taiob Ali, and Paresh Motiwala. Besides my own talk, I was able to catch the first five talks (unfortunately, I had to leave to prepare for my presentation, so I missed Paresh’s — but that’s okay, because he gives a terrible talk, anyway*), and I can tell you that every one of them was an awesome presentation. I loved every single one of them.

(*ed note: I’m kidding, Paresh! You know I love you!)

I get ready to do my presentation

All kidding aside… immediately after the lightning talks session, I had my own full-length presentation to do. I debuted a brand-new presentation about ‘blogging. For the most part, it went well, but it isn’t perfect. I did get a couple of comments back saying that they were expecting more about the career aspect of ‘blogging. Apparently, they were looking for a direct link between ‘blogging and career. The idea of my presentation is that ‘blogging can enhance your professional profile and well-being, but apparently, that didn’t come across in my presentation. I’m scheduled to give this talk again in Providence next month, so I’ll have to figure out what tweaks I need to make between now and then.

Other than that, I attended two other sessions: Matt Cushing’s networking presentation, and Thomas Grohser’s interviewing presentation. I’ve attended both presentations before, and they are both great sessions; if you ever have a chance to attend either presentation, I recommended them highly! Tom asked me to attend his; when I attended his previous sessions, he liked my questions and commentary so much that he asked me to come back to ask the same questions and make the same comments — for the benefit of others in attendance. For Matt’s session, it was more a matter of personal pride. He has given the presentation (I think it’s been) six times, and I have been to all six! It’ll be seven for seven next month; he’s coming back to Albany to give his presentation at our user group meeting!

SQL Saturday isn’t possible without the help of volunteers!

I had to skip out on the second round of sessions to pick up more ice (which was especially critical, since it was the hottest day of the year so far). I didn’t just speak at Albany SQL Saturday; I also served as a volunteer. As I’ve written before, SQL Saturday is an all-volunteer event, and they wouldn’t be possible without all the volunteers who do the behind-the-scenes dirty work, such as setting up, manning the registration tables, making coffee, cleaning up, assembling attendee bags, and all the little things that help make the event go (such as picking up more ice for the coolers). Volunteers are the unsung heroes of SQL Saturday, so if you ever attend an event, make sure that you show them your appreciation!

A few of us went out for ice cream after the speaker’s dinner!

There were many other aspects of SQL Saturday that made it fun — and are among the many reasons why it is one of my favorite events of the year! I didn’t even mention the speaker’s dinner on Friday night, the after-party on Saturday after it was all over, and the great time I had with many friends whom I often only get to see at these events!

SQL Saturday is a lot of hard work and effort, but it is well worth it! It isn’t just about the data sessions and free training; it’s also about networking, talking to vendors, making friends, and having fun! If you ever get to a SQL Saturday near you, I highly recommend it!

I’m a twit… I mean, I’m on Twitter

Okay, I’m a lemming. I finally caved.

For years, I’ve assiduously avoided Twitter. As I’ve been telling people, “I refuse to twit (sic).” I’ve never felt the need for it, I’ve never felt compelled to join it (to be honest, the hype surrounding it did more to repel me from it than make me want to use it), and I’ve been trying to stay away from it. It was enough that I was already on Facebook (and, for professional reasons, LinkedIn). I didn’t feel any need to join the Twitterverse.

Events over the past few weeks changed that. First, as I announced earlier this month, I was accepted to speak at PASS Summit. Second, I finally succumbed to peer pressure from friends such as Deborah Melkin and Matt Cushing. Third, I wanted to connect with #sqlfamily — which is entirely on Twitter.

Mostly, it was the PASS Summit deal that finally pushed me to do so. Twitter is the medium of choice for a great majority of people involved with PASS and SQL Saturday. Since this is my first PASS Summit, I needed a way to contact people if I needed to do so. And since nearly every speaker there is on Twitter, well…

So, therefore, it is with great trepidation and reluctance that, last week, I finally broke down and created a Twitter account. I’ve been sitting on it for a week, and really only made it publically known this past weekend at Albany SQL Saturday.

I’m still trying to figure out how to use the thing. Deb Melkin mentioned to me this past weekend that there were some hashtags that I should’ve used with my first tweet — at which point, she turned to some of our colleagues and said, “he’ll get the hang of it. We’ll teach him!”

I honestly don’t know how much I’ll be using the thing. I already use Facebook to post about my personal life, and I use my LinkedIn for professional endeavors, so I don’t really feel a need to do either on Twitter. I’ve connected my ‘blog to it, so you’ll see my articles on it whenever I post one. Beyond that, we’ll see.

So if you really feel a need to follow me, my Twitter profile is PianoRayK.

I’ll see you out there in the Twitterverse…

Upcoming speaking engagements (as of 7/11/2019)

I’ve had several speaking schedule updates since my last update, so I figured another update was in order.

Here are upcoming speaking engagements for which I am confirmed.

I’ve applied to speak at this event, but I am not yet confirmed.

So it appears that I’m going to be busy the next few months. Hopefully, I’ll see you at an event near you!

Speaking in Providence, RI — August 24

I just got the official email saying that I’ve been picked to speak at SQL Saturday in Providence, RI on August 24!

For the second time in as many months, I will be doing my brand-new presentation about ‘blogging!

SQL Saturday is always a good time! Come on out and check out my presentation on August 24!

Bragging about your accomplishments

It’s true that bragging about what you do — boasting, talking smack, and strutting around like a peacock — generally tends to be frowned upon. However, I was thinking about a situation this morning where, professionally, it is appropriate to brag about what you do.

Yesterday, I picked up a new LinkedIn contact. The person in question is a guy I see behind the counter at the corner Cumberland Farms every morning when I stop to get coffee. This is the same guy that commented on my shirt whom I mentioned a while back. He’s a college student studying IT and has worked mostly jobs like working the cash register at Cumberland Farms. Taking a quick look at his LinkedIn profile, you’d think that that was all he did. But I do converse with him whenever I see him, and what he does goes deeper than that.

He went to our last user group meeting, and he told me he’s looking forward to attending SQL Saturday next month. A while back, I told him that he should download a free copy of SQL Server Developer Edition and practice. He did so, and he told me that he’s been spending a few hours each day practicing his SQL skills.

It occurred to me that that’s the perfect thing to write about. What are you working on? What have you done? What did you come across? What have you learned? What questions do you still have? People, especially recruiters and managers, like to see things like that. It shows that you’re learning and accomplishing things, which reflects very well upon you. This is great fodder for a ‘blog or LinkedIn posts. You can mention these things on a resume, in a cover letter, or during an interview, and if you ‘blog about it, you can use that to back it up.

There is a difference between being an egotistical braggart and talking about your accomplishments. If you’re trying to get started in a career field, don’t be afraid to toot your own horn. By all means, go ahead and talk about what you do, what you learn, and even what you don’t know but want to learn. It demonstrates that you’re motivated, inspired, and interested — traits that potential employers like to see. While people don’t like people who seem to know-it-all, this is one scenario in which bragging about what you do is appropriate.