#BI101: Some SQL Saturday speakers to check out

This is part of a series of articles in which I’m trying to teach myself about BI.  Any related articles I write are preceded with “#BI101” in the title.

As a speaker on the SQL Saturday circuit, I’ve had the honor and privilege of having met, connected with, and even befriended a number of experts in SQL, data, and BI.  If you can get to get to a SQL Saturday, you can also have that opportunity.

In a couple of weeks (July 28), we will be hosting SQL Saturday here in Albany, NY.  I was going through the schedule, and noticed a number of speakers on the docket who will be talking about various BI topics.  I’ve attended a lot of their sessions, and I recommend these speakers highly!

(Note: for purposes of this article, I am limiting this list to BI topics, although these speakers may be giving other presentations as well.)

SQL Saturday is a great free learning resource, a great opportunity to network, and is always a good time!  If you’re looking to learn about BI or other data-related or professional topics, go check out a SQL Saturday event near you!

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#BI101: An introduction to BI using baseball

Edit: This is the first of a series of articles (I hope!) in which I’m trying to teach myself about BI.  Any articles I write that are related to this, starting with this one, will be preceded with “#BI101” in the title.

As I stated in a previous article, one topic about which I’m interested in learning more is business intelligence (BI).  For those of you who are new to BI, it is a broad topic.  In a nutshell, it can probably be described as “consuming and interpreting data so it can be used for business decisions and/or applications.”

I’ll admit that I don’t know a lot about BI (at least the fine details, anyway).  I did work a previous job where I touched upon it; I was tasked with performing some data analysis, and I was introduced to concepts such as OLAP cubes and pivot tables.  I’ve gotten better at creating pivot tables — I’ve done a few of them using MS Excel — but I’ll admit that I’m still not completely comfortable with building cubes.  I suppose that’ll come as I delve further into this.

A while back, my friend, Paresh Motiwala, suggested that I submit a presentation for Boston SQL Saturday BI edition.  At the time, I said to him, “the only thing I know about BI is how to spell it!”  He said to me (something like), “hey, you know how to spell SQL, don’t you?”  Looking back at the link, I might have been able to submit (I didn’t realize, at the time, that they were running a professional development track).  That said, Paresh did indeed had a point.  As I often tell people, I am not necessarily a SQL expert — I know enough SQL to be dangerous — nevertheless, that does not stop me from applying to speak at SQL Saturday.  Likewise, as I dive further into this topic, I’m finding that I probably know more about BI than I’ve led myself to believe.  Still, there is always room for improvement.

To tackle this endeavor, once again, I decided to jump into this using a subject that I enjoy profusely: baseball.  Baseball is my favorite sport, and it is a great source of data for stat-heads, mathematicians, and data geeks.  I’ve always been of the opinion that if I’m going to learn something new, I should make it fun!

Besides, the use of statistical analysis in baseball has exploded.  Baseball analytics is a big deal, ever since Bill James introduced sabermetrics (there is some debate as to whether James has enhanced or ruined baseball).  So what better way to introduce myself to BI concepts?

For starters, I came across some articles (listed below, for my own reference as much as anything else):

I also posted a related question in the SSC forums.  We’ll see what kind of responses (if any) I get to my query.

Let’s start with the basics — what is BI?

Since I’m using baseball to drive this concept, let’s use a baseball example to illustrate this.

Let’s say you’re (NY Yankees manager) Aaron Boone.  You’re down by a run with two outs in the bottom of the 9th.  You have Brett Gardner on first, Aaron Judge at bat, and you’re facing Craig Kimbrel on the mound.

What do you do?  How does BI come into play here?

Let’s talk a little about what BI is.  You have all these statistics available — Judge’s batting average, Kimbrel’s earned run average, Gardner’s stolen base percentage, and so on.  In years BS — “before sabermetrics” — a manager likely would have “gone with his gut,” decided that Judge is your best bet to hit the game-winning home run, and let him swing away.  But is this the best decision to make?

Let’s put this another way.  You have a plethora of data available at your fingertips.  BI represents the ability to analyze all this data and provide information that allows you to make a good decision.

If Aaron Boone (theoretically) had this data available at his fingertips (to my knowledge, Major League Baseball bans the use of electronic devices in the dugout during games), he could use the data to consider Kimbrel’s pitching tendencies, Judge’s career numbers against Kimbrel, and so on.  BI enables Boone to make the best possible decision based upon the information he has at hand.

I do want to make one important distinction.  In the above paragraphs, I used the words data and information.  These two words are not interchangeable.  Data refers to the raw numbers that are generated by the players.  Information refers to the interpretation of that data.  Therein lies the heart of what BI is — it is the process of generating information based upon data.

What’s there to know about BI?

I’ve already mentioned some buzzwords, including OLAP, cubes, and pivot tables.  That’s just scratching the surface.  There’s also KPIs, reporting services, decision support systems, data mining, data warehousing, and a number of others that I haven’t thought of at this point (if you have any suggestions, please feel free to add them in the comments section below).  Other than including the Wikipedia definition links, I won’t delve too deeply into them now, especially when I’m trying to learn about these myself.

So why bother learning about BI?

I have my reasons for learning more about BI.  Among other things…

  • It is a way to keep myself technically relevant.  I’ve written before about how difficult it is to stay up-to-date with technology.  (For further reading regarding this, I highly recommend Eugene Meidinger’s article about keeping up with technology; he also has a related SQL Saturday presentation that I also highly recommend.)  I feel that BI is a subject I’m able to grasp, learn about, and contribute.  By learning about BI, I can continue making myself technically valuable, even as my other technical skills become increasingly obsolete.  Speaking of which…
  • It’s another adjustment.  Again, I’ve written before about making adjustments to keep myself professionally relevant.  If there’s one thing I’ve learned, it’s that if you want to survive professionally, you need to learn to adjust to your environment.
  • It is a subject that interests me.  I’m sure that many of you, as kids, had “imaginary friends.”  (I’ll bet some adults have, too — just look at Lieutenant Kije and Captain Tuttle.)  When I was a kid, I actually had an imaginary baseball team.  I went as far as to create an entire roster full of fictitious ballplayers, even coming up with full batting and pitching statistics for them.  My star player was a power-hitting second baseman who had won MVP awards in both the National and American leagues, winning several batting titles (including a Triple Crown) and leading my imaginary team to three World Series championships.  I figured, if my interest in statistics went that far back, there must be something behind it.  Granted, now that I’ve grown up older, I’m not as passionate about baseball statistics as I was as a kid, but some level of interest still remains, nevertheless.
  • It is a baseline for learning new things.  I’ve seen an increasing number of SQL Saturday presentations related to BI, such as PowerBI, reporting services, and R.  I’m recognizing that these potentially have value for my workplace.  But before I learn more about them, I also need to understand the fundamental baseline that they support.  I feel that I need to learn the “language” of BI before I can learn about the tools that support it.

So, hopefully, this article makes a good introduction (for both you and myself) for talking about BI.  I’ll try to write more as I learn new things.  We’ll see where this journey goes, and I hope you enjoy coming along for the ride.

Humble beginnings

Once again, the Facebook “On This Day” memory feature shows it can be a curious thing.  And again, this is one I wanted to share.

The picture you see above showed up on my Facebook memories feed this morning.  Three years ago today, I gave a presentation at my local SQL Server user group meeting.  I had come up with a presentation idea that I thought would be of interest to my user group, as well as other technical professionals.  I jotted down some notes, put it into a presentation, and presented it at my local user group.

About a month later, I gave this very same presentation at our local SQL Saturday.  It was my first SQL Saturday presentation!

I was curious as to how other events would take to my presentation.  Later that year, I submitted it to, and was accepted at, another SQL Saturday.  It was my second time speaking at SQL Saturday, my first time speaking at an event in “foreign territory,” and my first SQL Saturday — speaking or attending — outside of New York State.

Since that humble beginning, I’ve spoken at 13 (soon to be 14) SQL Saturdays at seven different cities around the northeastern United States.  Thanks to this endeavor, I’ve traveled around the region, met a lot of great people, expanded my professional profile, started a ‘blog (that you’re reading right now!), enhanced my career, gained more confidence, improved my presentation skills, and become a better person.  This all came about because of these conferences and from this simple start three years ago.

I hope I’ll be doing many more!  Happy three year anniversary to me!

My hometown SQL Saturday: I’m speaking, July 28

I just got the official word that I will be speaking at my hometown SQL Saturday.

As of right now, I don’t know which presentation(s) I’m doing; I only know that I am speaking!

Come join us at UAlbany on July 28!  Go the link above to register, and mark your calendars!

On deck: SQL Saturday #716, NYC

Reminder: I am speaking at SQL Saturday #716, New York City this coming Saturday, May 19!  The conference will be at the Microsoft Technology Center, directly across 8th Avenue from the Port Authority Bus Terminal.  This is a secure location, so you must register using the link above if you want to attend!

I will be giving the following two presentations:

  • I lost my job!  Now what?!?  This is my career/job hunt presentation, and it’s becoming one of my best-sellers.  In this talk, I provide tips and advice for surviving a jobless situation.  Anyone who is looking for new employment is encouraged to attend!
  • So you want to be a SQL Saturday speaker?  This is a brand-new presentation that is making its debut at NYC SQL Saturday!  Want to be a speaker at SQL Saturday?  Here’s how I did it — and you can, too!

Hope to see you there!

SQL Saturday #714, Philadelphia

Last week, I received word that I’ve been selected to speak at SQL Saturday #714, Philadelphia (the actual location is Blue Bell, PA, which is outside of Philadelphia) on April 21!

At this time, I don’t yet know what I will be presenting.  When I do, I’ll post them to another ‘blog article.

Hope to see you there!

Coming soon: SQL Saturday #723, Rochester, NY

This afternoon, I received the following email:

There are only a few days remaining before your presentation at SQLSaturday #723 on Saturday, March 24, 2018 and we want to make a last push to bring in new attendees and remind those that have already signed up. Just a quick blog post, update on LinkedIn, or a tweet on Twitter is all we need.

Okay.  I will oblige!

Come out and check out SQL Saturday #723 in Rochester, NY on March 24 (as I write this, it’s a week from this Saturday)!

I will be doing the following two presentations:

  • I lost my job! Now what?!? A survival guide for the unemployed 

    You’ve just been told by HR that you are no longer a part of their organization. You’ve been kicked to the curb. You are now living in the no-man’s land called unemployment.

    Unemployment is a scary situation. You’re dealing with emotions and uncertainty. You don’t know if you’ll be out of work for days, weeks, or months.

    Fortunately, unemployment is survivable. In this session, I’ll share my own experiences (and perhaps we’ll talk about some of yours) with unemployment, and how I managed to get through the tough times. We’ll discuss emotional impact, the job hunt, and things you can do to get yourself through this tough time. Hopefully, you’ll land on your feet once again before long!

  • Disaster Documents: The role of documentation in disaster recovery
    I was an employee of a company that had an office in the World Trade Center on Sept. 11, 2001. Prior to that infamous date, I had written several departmental documents that ended up being critical to our recovery. In this presentation, I provide a narrative of what happened in the weeks following 9/11, and how documentation played a role in getting the organization back on its feet.

    While other disaster recovery presentations talk about strategies, plans, and techniques, this presentation focuses on the documentation itself. We will discuss the documents we had and how they were used in our recovery. We will also discuss what documents we didn’t have, and how they could have made the process better.

SQL Saturday is always a good time!  Come out and check it out.  And if you come to my presentations, feel free to say hi!