Maintain Your Trustworthiness

This is a reblog of an article written by my friend, Steve Jones. I would hope that this is something that goes without saying among data professionals like myself, but I think that it’s important enough that it’s worth repeating (and reblogging).

Voice of the DBA

Many of us that are DBAs and/or sysadmins find ourselves with privileged access to many systems. We can often read the data that’s stored in these systems, whether that’s a relational database, a NoSQL store, or even a mail system. As a result, it is incumbent upon us to be trustworthy and maintain confidentiality with privileged information.

Overall I think most of us do this, but there are always some rogue administrators out there, some of which might take malicious actions. There have been a few people that were arrested or sued for hacking into systems, trashing backups, or causing other issues. Often those are emotional outbursts that disrupt operations, and many people are aware there is an issue. However, what if people weren’t aware they were being hacked in some way?

I ran across this story about some “admin” software being sold on a hacker forum site, which was…

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Don’t fear the CrossFit

(Photo source: https://www.endlesscrossfit.com)

“I gotta run a little faster; I gotta reach for the sky; I gotta come a little closer; even if I lose, I gotta try…”
— Kansas, “Inside Of Me”

“Try not.  Do.  Or do not.  There is no try.”
— Yoda

Every Saturday, my CrossFit gym invites friends to join members for workouts (“Bring A Friend Day,” as it’s called).  It’s a little bit of a misnomer, as guests don’t necessarily have to be friends — as one coach likes to describe it, “bring your friends, neighbors, coworkers, colleagues, enemies, ‘frenemies,’ whomever.”  It doesn’t necessarily have to be by invitation; anyone interested in trying CrossFit can come to these classes — a type of “try before you buy” session, if you will.

I’ve tried to get friends to go to these sessions, with mixed success.  Those who do enjoy the sessions, but I have yet to have one friend (other than my wife) try it out and join the gym.  (Admittedly, there are fringe benefits for me to get someone to sign up — a month of free membership, for example.)

What’s interesting is those who don’t try it and outright refuse my offer to join me.  (As I tell people, joining me in these sessions pretty much guarantees that I will work out on Saturday!)  I tried to tell one friend that I thought CrossFit might benefit her.  Not only did she outright refuse to take me up on it, I got the impression that she was actually scared to try it.  She would not even keep an open mind about it; she just said, “I will NOT do it.  Don’t ever ask me about it again.”  End of conversation.

My question: why???

I would never twist anyone’s arm into trying it (well, okay, maybe friends with whom I know I can get away with it), but what I don’t completely understand is why people fear it.  I get why people won’t do things like go bungee-jumping (disclosure: I am deathly acrophobic), eating exotic foods (I’ll try almost anything, although I draw the line at anything that has more than four legs, shellfish excluded — Andrew Zimmern I’m not!), or do something on a dare.  But why are people afraid to try CrossFit?

I think part of it is that it’s human nature to fear what you don’t know.  People will see these images of CrossFit (I often post what I do on Facebook) and immediately get the impression that they’re expected to be able to lift large amounts of weights, be pushed to do double-unders, or be able to do pull-ups right off the bat.  The fear of “gymtimidation” comes into play.  People who fear it are likely afraid of being embarrassed or injured.

First, one of the selling points of CrossFit is that anyone can do it.  I’ve seen people as old as eighty (and even more!) in the gym.  I once saw a guy who had the use of only one arm in a workout (it was interesting watching him on a rower and an Assault bike).  I’ve seen newbies who struggle with weightlifting form.  Even I have my own struggles; I can’t (yet) do any moves that involve pulling myself up (pull-ups, muscle-ups, rope climbs, etc.), I have trouble with movements that involve squatting (I was diagnosed with osteoarthritis in my knees), and I’m not exactly the fastest runner (for me, there’s almost no difference between a jog, a sprint, or a fast walk).  Heck, even some warmups can sometime leave me out of breath.

However, one of CrossFit’s selling points is that it is scalable.  You are never asked to do anything you are not capable of doing.  If you have trouble with pull-ups (like I do), you can do barbell pull-ups or ring rows.  Unable to do a certain type of weightlifting movement?  Don’t worry about the weight; instead, use a lighter weight, an empty bar, or even a PVC pipe, and practice your technique.  Whatever movement gives you trouble, there is always a way to scale it that will allow you to perform it to your capabilities.

I’m sure the fear of being injured comes into play.  As I just said, you’ll never be pushed to do what you’re not capable of doing.  But one of the selling points for me is that CrossFit emphasizes technique.  If you are not sure about how to do a movement, coaches will teach you how.  If your form has issues, coaches will tweak it so it is better.  Technique is key to anything: the better your form, the less chance you’ll be injured.

I also think the intensity is a factor.  CrossFit can get very intense.  Admittedly, there isn’t a lot that’s enjoyable about working your tail off to the point where you’re gasping for breath and end up lying on the floor.  That’s something that can scare people off.  However, how hard you work out is up to you.  Intensity is what you make of it.  But why is it so intense?

I think it’s because the majority of people who take CrossFit seriously want to improve.  People push themselves because they want to get better at what they do.  Did a deadlift weight of 305 pounds?  Next time, I’m going to try 315.  Run 5,000 meters in under ten minutes?  Next time, shoot for nine.  CrossFit is about making yourself better.  While you are not asked to do anything you can’t do, you are asked to challenge yourself and push the limits of what you can do.  Even my own gym’s motto is “(Be)tter” (as in, “be better”).  I wrote before that you have to get uncomfortable in order to improve.  Making yourself better involves going out of your comfort zone.  How much discomfort — intensity — you decide to put into it is up to you.

Finally, there’s the phenomenon that Planet Fitness refers to as “gymtimidation.”  People are embarrassed by their lesser skill level and are often intimidated by performing in front of other people who are in much better shape.  This attitude does not exist in CrossFit.  Everyone — even the elite athletes — roots for everyone else to succeed.  I remember one time watching the CrossFit Games on TV and hearing the commentator say, “CrossFit is probably the only sport in which the person who comes in last gets the loudest cheers.”  Even in events where athletes are finished, they will often go back out into the field to cheer on and encourage those who are still working through the event.  Here’s a secret: everyone, at some point in their lives, was a beginner at something.  Someone once said that one of the worst phrases ever coined was “do it right the first time.”  It’s almost never done right the first time.  Fear of embarrassment should never be a factor in trying something new.

I wrote before that CrossFit is a supportive community.  I have made a large number of friends in CrossFit, and even though I look more like a couch potato than an elite athlete, I feel as comfortable with this group as I do as any group in which I’m involved.

Although people have their reasons why they don’t want to try CrossFit, fear should not be one of them.  CrossFit can be a fun and exciting way to keep fit.  Give it a try.  Who knows?  You might just get hooked — like I did!

And if any of my local friends are interested in hitting a Saturday “Bring A Friend” WOD, hit me up!

The importance of maintaining a LinkedIn account

My own presentation and a lightning talk by Paresh Motiwala from our SQL Saturday this past July got me thinking about my own LinkedIn account.  I’ve been going through the activities feed fairly regularly, making sure my ‘blog articles are posted, getting an idea of how many people see (much less, actually read) my articles, and to get occasional updates as to what my contacts are doing.  But it also occurred to me that it’s been a while since I did a full-fledged inventory of my own LinkedIn account.  I’ve written before about the importance of maintaining documentation, and my own LinkedIn profile is no exception.

Why inventory my LinkedIn account?  To answer this, I suppose I should explain why I have a LinkedIn account at all.

I’ll admit that I’m usually a lot more active on LinkedIn if I’m looking for a job.  I don’t know the statistics as to how people use LinkedIn, but it wouldn’t surprise me if job hunting is the number one reason.  Nevertheless, I try to check my LinkedIn fairly regularly, regardless of whether or not I’m looking for new employment.

I should note that, as of this article, I am not actively looking for employment.  That said, I still think it’s important to maintain my LinkedIn account.

Probably my biggest reason for maintaining a LinkedIn account is networking.  I’ve written before about the importance of networking in your professional lifetime.  I have an entire presentation about networking.  LinkedIn provides a tool for maintaining my networking contacts and staying in touch with them.  I’ve often said that one of my main reasons for maintaining my Facebook account is to keep in touch with family and friends, and to keep them up to date with whatever is happening in my life.  LinkedIn mostly serves the same purpose, with the primary difference being that the context is professional, not personal.

If you’re job hunting, a LinkedIn account is invaluable (I would even go as far as to say it’s necessary).  I came across an article (on LinkedIn, of course!) that stated about 85% of jobs were filled through networking.  I can personally attest to this; the person who hired me for my current job is connected to me through both Facebook and LinkedIn.

If you’re not convinced that LinkedIn is necessary for effective job hunting, imagine this scenario.  You’re a hiring manager who’s looking to fill one position, and is looking over two nearly identical resumes.  Both people are qualified for the position.  You decide that you want to know more about them.  You see that one has a LinkedIn profile.  The other does not.  Guess which one will have the advantage.

I’ve seen job applications that ask for your LinkedIn profile URL.  That tells me that employers take LinkedIn pretty seriously.

I said earlier that I am currently not actively seeking new employment.  However, I didn’t mention anything about passively looking.  Although I am content in my current position, I would be remiss if I didn’t keep my eyes and ears open for my next big thing, whether it’s a step up in my position or my salary.

I attended a SQL Saturday presentation by my friend, James Serra, about how to build your career.  One of the takeaways from his presentation was not to get comfortable if you want to get ahead — a point that prompted me to write about it in another ‘blog article.  Granted, I enjoy what I do, and I’m sure I could remain in my position for some time, but I’d be crazy to pass up an opportunity that represents a major step up and is right up my alley.

So, I started going through my own LinkedIn profile.  First, I went through my contacts to make sure it was up-to-date.  I started by going through the last SQL Saturday schedule, looking through the speaker profiles to see who else had LinkedIn accounts (those who have one are noted by a LinkedIn icon under their names), and checking to make sure I was connected to them.  I should note that I did not do this with all the speakers, but mainly the ones I know reasonably well and with whom I feel comfortable connecting.

Going through the “People you may know” feature, I was surprised to find a number of people whom I know but was not already connected on LinkedIn.  I sent them invitations to connect with me.  As of this article, about ten of them have accepted my invitation within the past week.  More will be coming, I’m sure.

I also looked at my own summary and realized that it’s not really a “summary” — that is, it should be a list of highlights and fairly easy to read.  I have some ideas in my head as to how to rewrite it; I have not yet done so as of this article.  Nevertheless, my personal professional summary will definitely get some tweaking sometime in the days ahead.

Whenever I assemble a new presentation, I make sure that it is listed under my Publications section.  It indicates that I am active with my presentations.  Demonstrating that you are doing something to enhance your background (in this case, staying active with my SQL Saturday presentations) is always a good thing.

I also solicit recommendations from people.  Maintaining recommendations on your LinkedIn enhances your profile.  And I make it a point to reciprocate when someone leaves me a recommendation.  This is a key point of networking; networking is a two-way street.  If someone does you a favor, make sure you do the same.

Maintaining LinkedIn is critical for your professional career.  I only talked about a few reasons for maintaining your account; there are many more that I didn’t mention.  (Out of curiosity, I Google-searched “reasons to maintain linkedin account” and a number of links showed up.)  In this day and age where maintaining an online presence is nearly expected, LinkedIn might make the difference in advancing your career.

SQL Saturday #797, Boston, Sept. 22

I received word this week that I’ve been selected to speak at SQL Saturday #797, Boston, MA (more accurately, Burlington, MA) on September 22!  This is the third time I’ve applied to speak at Boston, and the first time I’ve been selected.  I suppose the third time’s a charm!

I will be doing a brand-new presentation (that made its debut in Albany last weekend): “Networking 101: Building professional relationships” (formerly named “Networking: it isn’t just for breakfast anymore”).  This is an interactive session in which we will discuss networking — what it is, and why it’s important.  You’ll even have a chance to practice networking within the confines of our room!

Mark your calendars, and I hope to see you in Burlington, MA on September 22!

SQL Saturday #741 Albany — the debrief

Once again, we had another great SQL Saturday here in Albany this past weekend!  I don’t know how many people attended, but by my estimate, we had well over two-hundred people.  I had a great time (as usual), and it serves to remind me why this is one of my favorite events.

My own presentation went very well!  I had nine people attend my session.  Two people (not including myself) were in the room when I started, but more people started filing in after I began my presentation.  Everyone I spoke with told me it was a great presentation, and I got nothing but positive feedback!

I did, however, get one piece of feedback that I did not expect.  I spoke with a number of people who did not attend my presentation, and one who almost skipped it (but ended up coming, anyway).  They all told me the same thing: they read my presentation title and automatically assumed that my talk was about computer networking, not business networking.  Had they known that, they all told me, they would have been there.  So I missed out on a potentially larger audience, simply because of my presentation title.

My initial reaction was frustration.  Mt first thought was, “read the presentation abstract, people!”  I didn’t want to change it; I liked the title and thought it was clever (I’d taken it from one of my ‘blog articles with the same name).  At the same time, I also couldn’t ignore the feedback; it’s human nature to judge a book by its cover (or, in the case, the title), and first impressions are important.  So, reluctantly, I renamed my presentation.  At the same time, I also made a slight tweak to my presentation slides; I removed one slide that did not serve much purpose during my presentation.

I’d be remiss if I didn’t mention a great event without talking about other great presentations.  I attended James Serra‘s session on presenting.  I’m always looking to improve upon my own presentation skills, and I got a lot out of James’ presentation (as always).  Not only did I pick up a few new tips, he also reinforced some points that I use in my own presentations.  This is always good to hear; it legitimizes things that I discuss.  I also sat in on a less serious presentation by Thomas Grohser.  At the end of the day, a little humor is a good thing.  James and Thomas are both excellent speakers, and I always recommend them.  I’d also heard great things about a session I’d missed presented by my friend, Deborah Melkin, another wonderful speaker that I highly recommend.

Unfortunately, part of the reason why I missed Deborah’s session (and others) was an issue that needed my attention.  When I arrived at the event site that morning, one of my tires went flat.  I didn’t have the time to address it, and I didn’t feel much like dealing with it, especially on a warm and humid day.  Fortunately, I have a AAA membership.  Let me tell you about how handy that became that afternoon.

Of course, there were also the events around SQL Saturday.  Friday night was the speaker’s dinner.  It was held at a Mediterranean restaurant about ten minutes away from my office.  I’ve driven past this place many times, and had no idea that it was there.  It was a good place, and I’m going to keep it in mind!  The closing and accompanying raffles are always fun.  My wife’s name was actually drawn for a prize!  Unfortunately, she couldn’t claim it, simply because she was not there, and the rules stipulate that you need to be present to win!  (Some people said that I should claim it by proxy, but at the same time, rules are rules!)  The post-event party was held at a place across the street, a great opportunity to mix and mingle with fellow speakers and event volunteers in a loose and casual atmosphere!

All in all, it was a great event!  This is one of my favorite events, and I look forward to doing this again next year!

Don’t keep an idea to yourself

My friend Greg Moore recently commented on a Facebook post regarding our upcoming SQL Saturday (tomorrow!) in which he credited me for my idea about a forum about women in technology.  The idea had occurred to me when I saw that Rochester SQL Saturday was doing such a forum, and I suggested that we should do one as well.  To be honest, I’d forgotten that I’d made the suggestion until I saw Greg’s comment earlier this week.

It just goes to show that you never know where an idea might lead.  I made a simple suggestion about an idea I’d seen about a forum discussion.  Tomorrow, it’s going to become reality.

For whatever reason, it made me think about the following meme.

Image result for sharknado meme

So the moral of the story: if you have an idea, don’t keep it to yourself.  You never know where it might lead.

#BI101: The need for having both a DW and cubes

This is part of a series of articles in which I’m trying to teach myself about BI.  Any related articles I write are preceded with “#BI101” in the title.

This morning, this post from my friend and fellow SQL Saturday speaker, James Serra, crossed my inbox.  (Hope you don’t mind me sharing, James!)  Because it fits very nicely into my personal BI education endeavor, I wanted to post a link to his article, both for my own reference and for anyone else looking for more information.  His article includes links to other articles about BI.

James and I are both speaking at SQL Saturday #741 in Albany a week from tomorrow (July 28).  Come check out our presentations, and feel free to use the opportunity to ask us questions and to network!  Hope to see you there!