Looking Back

This is a reblog of a post from my friend, Steve Jones. He touches on a topic that is near and dear to my heart, and one that I strongly believe is crucially important.

Nearly all of my SQL Saturday presentations have revolved around documentation and technical communication. Technology may have changed over the years, but the importance of documentation has not. I strongly believe that documentation is getting to the point where it is being dangerously ignored, something that we, as technical professionals, cannot afford to do.

Voice of the DBA

Someone sent me this post on 40 years of programming. It’s a read that laments a few things and complains about many others. Most of the thoughts are opinions, and as such, you may or may not see validity in them. I suspect most of you, like me, see some things are mostly true and some as just false. Since I’ve been in this business for nearly 30 years, many of the comments bring back memories and thoughts about my career as well.

One of the things I do lament is the declining quality of documentation. I’ve seen the volume and detail decline over the years. I wouldn’t want to go back to paper, but I would like to see better examples and more complete examination of the ins and outs of the various functions and features. Far too often I find that there are examples, explanations, or behaviors…

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My introduction to Docker

With my (still-relatively) new job comes an introduction to new (to me) technology. In this case, the technology in question is Docker.

For those of you unfamiliar with Docker (like me), it is, in a nutshell, a tool for deploying and running an application within a container. It is an improvement over VM (virtual machine) in that it runs at the operating system, rather than the hardware, level, resulting in less overhead and a more efficient environment.

As part of my indoctrination into Docker, I looked up some resources to help me get started.  I found this entry that seems to be very helpful.  I’m sure I’ll find some others as well.  I’ll post them as I go along.  I also installed Docker on my work laptop and have been playing with it.  At the moment, I am far from an expert on Docker (in fact, I’m not even close), but I feel like I’m starting to get the hang of how it works.  Hopefully, I’ll be productive with it before long.

I also noticed that, in the schedule for our upcoming SQL Saturday, one of the sessions focuses on Docker.  I intend to attend that session.  At this point, any resource that helps me to learn this technology is definitely of interest.

Does anyone else have any suggested resources for helping me (and others) learn Docker?  Feel free to comment below!

My hometown SQL Saturday: Albany, NY, July 29

My local SQL user group is hosting SQL Saturday on July 29, a week from this Saturday!

I will be speaking; I will be giving my presentation on documentation.  There are also a number of other presentations that people might find of interest.

When I attended SQL Saturday in New York City a couple of months ago, I sat in on Lisa Margerum’s session on networking.  It is an excellent session, and I recommend it highly.

A number of my friends are also presenting, including Greg Moore, Thomas Grohser, George Walters, John Miner, and Ed Pollack.  They always give good presentations, and I recommend them highly.  Check out the schedule for more details.

Hope to see you there!

 

An Orange Bucket List – 20 Public Activities on the Syracuse University Campus

I came across this ‘blog related to my beloved undergraduate alma mater, and decided to reblog. I had no idea there was a bagel shop in Hendrick’s Chapel!

Wanderlust... on a Budget

Okay, we’ve gone long enough without talking about the heart of Syracuse, and that is the Syracuse University campus. As an alumna, employee, and Syracuse basketball fan, the “city on the hill” holds an important spot in my heart. SU’s campus is a great place to wander around, particularly on a nice summer evening or autumn afternoon. Everyone seems to have their favorite spot on campus – whether as a place to study, spot to relax, or café to meet up with friends. So, I’ve brainstormed a ‘bucket list’ of things to do on the SU campus.

Kit

  1. Walk up the stairs that lead to the Hall of Languages – the center and origin of the SU campus. It’s a beautiful ivy-covered building that is as old as the university itself. Pass by the tulips planted in memorial to the students we lost on Pan Am flight 103; pay your respects.
  2. Abraham Lincoln StatueSit on…

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So, what’s in it for me… I mean, the company?

The Facebook “Your Memories” feature can sometimes be an interesting thing.  Yesterday, this memory from four years ago came up on my Facebook feed, and it’s one I want to share.

I think I’ve discovered the secret to great interviews — and I’m sharing this for the benefit of other job seekers like me.

Based on some resources that I’ve read (including “What Color Is Your Parachute?”), most job seekers go to an interview wanting to know, “what’s in it for me?” What they *should* be doing is asking the company, “what’s in it for them?” In other words, ask the company what they want and what you can do to fulfill it. Sell yourself on the precept of what value you bring to the company.

For the past two days, I’ve gone into interviews with this mindset, and it has served me well. It’s one of the reasons why I feel like I aced yesterday’s interview. Also, during this morning’s interview, I asked the question, “what are intergroup dynamics like? What other groups do you work with, how are the relationships, and what can I do to improve them?” When I asked that, I saw nods around the room that said, “that’s a good question!”

It’s too soon to say whether or not I landed either job, but I feel like I interviewed well, and I feel like I have a fighting chance.

Ever since I had this revelation four years ago, I’ve used this approach in every single job interview.  I won’t say that I aced every single job interview — I didn’t — but this mindset has made for better interviewing on my part.

Let me back up a little before I delve into this further.  It’s been often said that you should never not ask questions at a job interview.  Asking questions demonstrates that you’re interested in the job.  I’ve heard stories where a job candidate completely blew the interview simply because he or she did not ask any questions.  Not asking questions demonstrates that you’re indifferent toward the company or the job.

That said, it’s also important to ask the right questions.  Never ask about salary or benefits (as a general rule, I believe that you should never talk about salary or benefits, unless the interviewer brings it up).  If at all possible, try to avoid questions that ask, “what’s in it for me.”  Instead, ask questions that demonstrate, “how can I help you.”

Employers are nearly always looking for value, and their employees are no exception.  When interviewing potential candidates, they look to see what kind of value the candidates offer.  For me, I go to every job interview with a number of questions that I’ve formulated in advance — questions that demonstrate I’m interested, and I want to help.  For example, one question I always ask is, “what issues does the company or organization face, and how can I help address them?”  I’m asking what I can do for them.  It shows that I’m interested, and it shows that I’m willing to lend a hand.

For your reference, I found this information in my local library.  A couple of books I would recommend include the most recent edition of What Color Is Your Parachute? and Best Questions to Ask On Your Interview.  Among other things, these books provide ideas for questions for you to take with you to the interview.  Much of this information is also available on the internet; do a search and see what you can find.

I would also consider attending seminars and conferences, if you are able to do so.  For example, Thomas Grohser, one of my friends on the SQL Saturday speaker’s circuit, has a presentation called “Why candidates fail the job interview in the first minute.”  I’ve sat in on his presentation, and I would recommend it to any job seeker.

I won’t say that this mindset guarantees that you’ll get the job, but it will increase your chances.  This approach shows the interviewer that you’re interested, and you can add value to the organization.

Best of luck to you in your interview.

The search is over!

I am pleased to report that I have landed!  I have been offered — and have accepted — a position at TEKSystems!

No rest for the unemployed

A while back, I wrote an article that I affectionately refer to as the “job hunter’s survival guide.”  One of the things I mention in the article is to “keep busy.”  In my current state of unemployment, I’ve discovered that I’m busier than I ever thought I would be.

First, there’s the job hunt itself.  I’ve often told people that “looking for a job is a full-time job.”  I have yet to disprove that theory.  My work days have been spent working on my resume, applying to positions, touching base with my networking contacts, interviewing, taking assessment exams, following up on leads and applications, and so on.  That makes for a lot of work, and it makes up a good chunk of my working hours.

Second, there are a number of things with which I’m involved.  I’ve said before that getting involved is a good thing for multiple reasons.  Since my former employer and I parted ways, I’ve been to two SQL Saturdays (including one in which I presented), and am scheduled to present at a third one in July.  I’ve rehearsed with my wind quintet.  I’m involved with my local SQL user group.  I work out at the gym.  I also have a number of things with other groups (such as one of my alumni groups) that I need to address.

Third, even staying at home doesn’t offer a break from my to-do list.  Household chores need to be addressed — I have a long list of items around the house.  We have two cats that want attention.  Those of you who are homeowners understand the struggle.  When you own a house, there’s never a shortage of things to do.

For someone like me, I’m finding a few other things to keep me busy.  If you’re reading this article, you’re looking at one of those things.  A writer — even a ‘blog author — always has something to do if he or she has something to write about.  I also have some presentation ideas that I want to develop; hopefully, you’ll see them soon at a SQL Saturday near you.  In doing so, I’m looking for more opportunities to learn new things and keep myself up-to-date.

Staying busy is a good thing; you don’t want to be idle.  If a prospective employer asks what you did during your downtime, you can list all these things you did to keep yourself busy.  When you’re in the job market, small things like this can give you an edge.