The evolution of statistics

During my lunch break, I was perusing the ESPN website and stumbled across this article. It contemplates whether or not a .300 hitter (in baseball, for those of you who are sports-challenged) is meaningful anymore. As a baseball fan, the article caught my attention. I didn’t read through the entire article (it ended up being a much longer read than I expected — too long for me to read while on a lunch break at work), but from what little I did glean from it, a couple of things struck me.

First, they talk about Mickey Mantle‘s batting average and how important hitting .300 was to him. That struck me a little funny, because (as far as I know — as I said, I didn’t get through the entire article) there was no mention of the fact that he actually finished with a batting average under .300. His career batting average was .298.

The second thing that struck me was (Yankees’ first baseman) Luke Voit saying how he felt that “feel like batting average isn’t a thing now.” Indeed, baseball is a much different game than it was, say ten, twenty, or thirty years ago. Analytics are a big part of statistics these days. A lot of stats that are prevalent now — WAR (wins above replacement), exit velocity, OPS (on-base plus slugging), etc. — didn’t even exist when I was a kid growing up, closely following my Yankees. Back when I was eating and sleeping baseball, hitting was about the triple-crown statistics — batting average, home runs, and runs batted in (RBIs). But now, we have “slash lines,” on-base percentage, slugging percentage, and so on. Even as big of a baseball fan as I am, I haven’t a clue about many of these “new age” stats. I still have no idea what WAR represents, I’m not completely sure as to what the numbers in a slash-line are, and I don’t know what constitutes a respectable OPS.

That got me thinking about how statistics have changed over the years, and whether or not that applies to statistics outside of baseball (or sports, for that matter). Maybe people who study data analytics for a living might know this better than I do, but what business statistics have a different meaning now than they did ten, twenty years ago? Are there any numbers from way back when that I should now take with a grain of salt?

I’m sure there are many examples of this outside of sports, but I struggled to come up with any. Off the top of my head, I remember how a company where I once worked made a big deal out of perfect attendance — to the point that they gave out perfect attendance awards at the end of the year. However, that had to contend with situations such as coming to work when you were sick, and so on. Do you really want someone who’s sick coming into work? These days, workplaces do not want sick people in the office, and with the advent of work-at-home provisions, perfect attendance isn’t so meaningful, anymore. (By the way, my understanding is that company no longer recognizes or rewards “perfect” attendance.)

So I suppose the takeaway is, how well do statistics age? Can they be compared with the same statistics now? What needs to be considered when analyzing statistics from years ago? It’s true that numbers often tell a story, but in order to get the full picture, you also need to understand the full context.

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SQL Saturday #835, Philadelphia — 5/4/19 (a week from this Saturday)

I just received an email from the organizers of SQL Saturday #835, saying that I should ‘blog about the upcoming event. Okay, I will oblige!

This is the fourth consecutive year that I am speaking at Philadelphia SQL Saturday, and they’ve all been fun experiences! (Last year, I even wrote an article in which I documented my trip!)

This year, I will be doing my presentation on tech writing and documentation.

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Chewie says, “May the 4th be with you at SQL Saturday!”

And… because this year’s Philadelphia SQL Saturday falls on May 4, attendees are encouraged to wear their favorite Star Wars garb. Yes, I intend to participate. No, I’m not saying how. You’ll just have to wait until May 4 to find out!

So if you’re interested in databases, data science, technology, professional development, or just want to hang out with a bunch of computer geeks, and you’re in southeastern Pennsylvania or southern New Jersey a week from Saturday, go register on their site, and we’ll see you there. May the fourth be with you!

SQL Saturday #813 (BI Edition), Boston, MA — I’m speaking!

I just got the official word! I will be speaking at SQL Saturday #813 (BI edition), Boston (actually, Burlington), MA on March 30! This is my first scheduled SQL Saturday presentation for 2019!

I will do my presentation on talking tech-speak to non-technical people!

This will make three times (all in the same building, no less!) that I’ve spoken here since this past September. The first was for SQL Saturday #797, and the second will be in two weeks for the New England SQL Server User Group.

Hope to see people there — either in a couple of weeks, or at the end of March!

SQL Saturday #855 Albany announced!

The Capital Area SQL Server User Group (CASSUG) is pleased to announce that, for the sixth time, we will host SQL Saturday #855, Albany on July 20!

For additional information, to register for the event, or to submit a presentation, click the link above!

I’ve already submitted presentations, but I will be there, regardless of whether or not I’m picked to speak!

Hope to see you there!

Speaking near Beantown

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I got an email last night announcing that SQL Saturday #813 Boston — BI Edition has been scheduled for March 30, 2019.  I went ahead and submitted my presentations.

Because the Boston Microsoft office (despite the name, it’s actually in Burlington, MA, about twelve miles northwest of Boston) is a smaller facility, events such as SQL Saturday tend to be smaller; it’s more difficult to be accepted as a speaker, and a wait list for attendees is not uncommon.  Nevertheless, if I am accepted to speak at SQL Saturday #813 (far from a sure thing), that is potentially three trips I’ll make to Burlington within a span of seven months.  I am already scheduled to speak at SQL Saturday #797 on September 22 (a week from this Saturday as I write this) and at a New England SQL User Group meeting on February 13.  SQL Saturday #813 would make it trip #3.

Despite the fact that the Boston area tends to be hostile territory for a Yankee fan like me, I look forward to my upcoming trips.  I’m hoping to make it three trips in seven months.

Hope to see you there!

#BI101: The need for having both a DW and cubes

This is part of a series of articles in which I’m trying to teach myself about BI.  Any related articles I write are preceded with “#BI101” in the title.

This morning, this post from my friend and fellow SQL Saturday speaker, James Serra, crossed my inbox.  (Hope you don’t mind me sharing, James!)  Because it fits very nicely into my personal BI education endeavor, I wanted to post a link to his article, both for my own reference and for anyone else looking for more information.  His article includes links to other articles about BI.

James and I are both speaking at SQL Saturday #741 in Albany a week from tomorrow (July 28).  Come check out our presentations, and feel free to use the opportunity to ask us questions and to network!  Hope to see you there!

SQL Saturday #741, Albany, NY — Come to upstate New York!

On Saturday, July 28 (a week from tomorrow as I write this), our local Albany-area SQL user group will host our fifth SQL Saturday!  I have participated in all five; I worked as a volunteer at the first one, and I presented at the other four (including next Saturday).  This is one of my favorite events, and I look forward to it every single year!

This year, I am debuting a brand-new presentation: “Networking: it isn’t just for breakfast anymore,” based upon my ‘blog article of the same name.  (An alternate name for it could be “Networking 101: networking for beginners.”)  This presentation is primarily for people who want to get better at networking but don’t know how to do it, although seasoned veterans might be able to get something out of it as well.  It’s one of the first sessions of the day (8:30 am!), so come early!

As much as I promote my own presentations, mine is not the only one on the docket.  There are many wonderful speakers and presentations being given at this event, and I encourage you to come out and check out as many as you can that interest you!

SQL Saturday is always a great time, a great opportunity for free learning, and a great opportunity to network with data professionals.  The Capital District region here in upstate New York has been my home for many years.  I hope to see you here in my home turf!