November CASSUG Monthly Meeting

Our November meeting will again be online. NOTE: you MUST RSVP to the Meetup at https://www.meetup.com/Capital-Area-SQL…/events/274347375/ to view the Zoom URL!

Our November guest speaker is Leslie Andrews!

Topic: Building a Strong Foundation for Data Analysis

We are living in a world full of data but what we need is information. What is required to transform data into information? What are the foundational activities your organization needs to do in order to produce analytics that you are confident in sharing? In this session we will discuss what is needed for your organization to convert data into information, the basics of: Data Governance, Data Modeling and how to have an immediate impact using tools like Power BI to deliver value; and, Data Visualizations and telling stories with the data.

About Leslie:

Leslie Andrews is a Senior Consultant with 3 Cloud Solutions (formerly Pragmatic Works Consulting), an Azure Certified Data Engineer, and was a 2018-2019 Idera ACE. She obtained her BBA with an MIS concentration from the Anderson School of Management at the University of New Mexico and worked in the public sector for 15 years developing applications, databases, and ETL processes. She enjoys spending time with her family, travelling, climbing, kettlebells, and reading epic fantasy; she is active in the SQL community, and on the Governing Board of a Charter School.

Our online meeting schedule is as follows:

  • 6:00: General chat, discussion, and announcements
  • 6:30: Presentation

We usually wrap up between 7:30 PM and 8:00 PM.

Please RSVP to Meetup (https://www.meetup.com/Capital-Area-SQL…/events/274347375/), then use the online event URL to join (note: you MUST RSVP for the URL to be visible). We will send out a meeting password as we get closer to the event.

October CASSUG Monthly Meeting

Our October meeting will again be online. NOTE: you MUST RSVP on Meetup at https://www.meetup.com/Capital-Area-SQL-Server-User-Group/events/273734124/ to view the Zoom URL!

Our October guest speaker is Elizabeth Noble!

Topic: Streamline Database Deployments

Our online meeting schedule is as follows:

  • 6:00: General chat, discussion, and announcements
  • 6:30: Presentation

We usually wrap up between 7:30 PM and 8:00 PM.

Please RSVP to this Meetup, then use the online event URL to join (note: you MUST RSVP for the URL to be visible). We will send out a meeting password as we get closer to the event.

September CASSUG Monthly Meeting @CASSUG_Albany #SQLUserGroup #SQLFamily

Our September meeting will again be online. NOTE: you MUST RSVP to this Meetup (https://www.meetup.com/Capital-Area-SQL-Server-User-Group/events/272490472/) to view the Zoom URL!

Our September guest speaker is Mindy Curnutt!

Topic: An Introduction to using the Spatial Data features within SQL Server

Over a decade ago Microsoft added the capability to store and work with geometry and geography data types. (Wait…what’s this you say?!?) Well, yes…it’s been there for quite some time now. You can actually store spatial data in SQL tables (in the form of points, lines and polygons). There are also many powerful, built-in functions that allow the manipulation and calculation of results around this data. This is a powerful, but sadly underused feature of the product given that IoT tends to be so focused around the location of things.

Come to this session to learn about:

  • The two elusive data types (geography and geometry)
  • How to load spatial data
  • Where you can get lots and lots of free spatial data to supplement your existing systems
  • See an example of real-world Spatial data in use (aggregating truck positions for tax calcs)
  • Write a SQL query from a bitmap picture (pure amusement)

You will learn:

About two special data types, geography and geometry

  • Understand the different spatial routines and functions, what they do, what type of result they return, and how you would use each
  • Watch a real world business case where using spatial data made things so much easier

About Mindy:

Mindy Curnutt is 7X Microsoft Data Platform MVP, Friend of Redgate and Idera ACE Alumni. She has been actively involved in the SQL Server Community for nearly two decades, presenting at various User Group Meetings, SQLPASS Summits, as well as Conferences & SQLSaturdays across North America. For two years, she was a Team Lead for the SQLPASS Summit Abstract Review Process and for years served as one of the 3 SQLPASS Summit Program Managers. She was a SME for SQL 2012 & 2014 MS SQL Server Cert Exams and helped to author the MS Press Book “SQL Server 2014 – Step by Step”, co-authored “Voices from the Data Platform” and “SQL Server 2017 Administration Inside-Out” and in 2018 was featured in the book “Data Professionals at Work”. In 2018 Mindy was the VP of Strategic Partnerships for the Non-Profit Girls+Data (www.girlsanddata.org) which strived to bring awareness about careers in Data Science and Analytics to young women in Junior High School (ages 10-14). She was the President of the N Texas SQL Server User’s Group from 2017-2020. In 2020 she was elected to serve on the Board of Directors for PASS.

Mindy serves as a mentor to others, (particularly the Transportation & Logistics industry), helping to educate and promote scalable and sustainable SQL Server architecture and design. She is passionate about Data Security, Accessibility, Usability, Scalability, and Performance. Mindy Curnutt is an Independent Consultant. You can follow Mindy at her blog, curnuttdatasolutions.com and on Twitter where she’s known as @sqlgirl

Our online meeting schedule is as follows:
6:00: General chat, discussion, and announcements
6:30: Presentation

We usually wrap up between 7:30 PM and 8:00 PM.

Please RSVP to this Meetup, then use the online event URL to join (note: you MUST RSVP for the URL to be visible). We will send out a meeting password as we get closer to the event.

The #Coronavirus chronicles, part 17: Check out virtual user group meetings #COVID19

With the COVID-19 pandemic affecting just about every aspect of our lives, we’ve had to adapt. A couple of weeks ago, we hosted SQL Saturday virtually. Likewise, a number of user groups, including our local SQL group, have resorted to holding virtual group meetings.

I wrote a while back that there are benefits to being involved with non-local user groups. That was before the pandemic. Now that many user groups are holding virtual meetings, geography is no longer a factor. You can attend nearly any user group meeting that is held virtually.

During the pandemic, I’ve received numerous notifications for virtual SQL user group meetings. Most of them arrive in my inbox via Meetup, and I’ve gotten them through my involvement with these groups or through their local SQL Saturdays. Here are some of the (mostly SQL, unless noted) user group Meetups emails that I receive (note: the Philadelphia groups use Eventbrite, not Meetup, and Rochester uses the tools supplied by PASS).

If you’re interested in doing some networking and learning new things, check out a user group. Now that many of them are holding virtual meetings, your location is no longer a factor.

August CASSUG Monthly Meeting @CASSUG_Albany #SQLUserGroup #SQLFamily

Our August meeting (Monday, August 10, 6 pm) will again be online. Use the Meetup URL (https://www.meetup.com/Capital-Area-SQL-Server-User-Group/events/271750998/) to RSVP. NOTE: you MUST RSVP to the Meetup to view the Zoom URL!

Our August guest speaker is Deborah Melkin!

Topic: Single Statement, Many Changes: How One Statement Can Modify Multiple Tables

You can only insert, update, or delete from one table at a time. At least that’s what they tell us when we first learn to write SQL statements. However, that one statement could modify multiple tables, and we may or may not even realize it is happening.In this session, we will examine how a single data manipulation (DML) statement could change data for many tables. We will approach these from two different angles: implicit database design & explicit SQL code and objects. Syntax, performance gains, and gotchas of these different methodologies will be discussed. Finally, we will explore often overlooked changes that occur further downstream as a result of our DML statement.When you leave, you will understand and appreciate how a DML statement against one table affects not only that table but how it can have a ripple effect of changes throughout your entire database.

About Deborah: Deborah Melkin has been working as a database professional with SQL Server for almost 20 years. She spends her days helping programmers with all aspects of database design, queries, performance, and deployment. In 2016, she began her blog, Deb the DBA. Soon after that, she began speaking at SQL Saturdays and user groups. Deborah is a board member of the New England SQL Server User group (NESQL) and was recently named as an IDERA ACE Class of 2020. She also won Speaker Idol at PASS Summit 2019. In her spare time, Deborah can usually be found doing something musical.

Our online meeting schedule is as follows:
6:00: General chat, discussion, and announcements
6:30: Presentation

We usually wrap up between 7:30 PM and 8:00 PM.

Please RSVP to this Meetup (https://www.meetup.com/Capital-Area-SQL-Server-User-Group/events/271750998/), then use the online event URL to join (note: you MUST RSVP for the Zoom URL to be visible). We will send out a meeting password as we get closer to the event.

See you there!

#SQLSaturday #961 Albany — TOMORROW! July 25 #SQLSat961 #SQLSatAlbany

IMPORTANT!  If you are attending SQL Saturday, you MUST register on the SQL Saturday website (NOT Meetup or Facebook) at https://www.sqlsaturday.com/961!

This is a reminder that tomorrow, July 25, CASSUG will host Albany SQL Saturday for the seventh time!  And for the first time, Albany SQL Saturday is going virtual!

We will have a full day of great presentations that cover a variety of topics that include, but aren’t limited to, business intelligence, data science, database development, data architecture, and professional development!

We will also have our usual wrap-up and raffles at the end of the day!

To register, go to https://www.sqlsaturday.com/961.  It is important that you register at this site; RSVPs to Meetup or Facebook do not register you for SQL Saturday!!!

SQL Saturday is always a good time!  We hope to see you (virtually) on Saturday, July 25!

July CASSUG Monthly Meeting @CASSUG_Albany #SQLUserGroup #SQLFamily

Greetings, data enthusiasts!

Our July 15 meeting will again be online. NOTE: you MUST RSVP to this Meetup (see instructions below) to view the Zoom URL!

This is our annual July meeting in which we feature lightning talks, and discuss our upcoming SQL Saturday!

Want to do a lightning talk for our July monthly meeting? Contact Greg Moore at mooregr@greenms.com by July 8!

Lightning talks should be around 10 to 15 minutes in length. It can be about any topic that appeals to data professionals, including (but not limited to) T-SQL, performance tuning, BI, tools, and professional development. New and novice speakers are especially welcome and encouraged to apply!

Our online meeting schedule is as follows:
6:00: General chat, discussion, and announcements
6:30: Presentation

We usually wrap up between 7:30 PM and 8:00 PM.

Please RSVP to our Meetup at https://www.meetup.com/Capital-Area-SQL-Server-User-Group/events/268246385/ then use the online event URL to join (note: you MUST RSVP to the Meetup for the Zoom URL to be visible). We will send out a meeting password as we get closer to the event.

See you then!

2020 Albany #SQLSaturday is virtual, and I’m on the schedule! July 25 #SQLSat961 #SQLSatAlbany @CASSUG_Albany

The schedule for my hometown SQL Saturday is out, and I’m on it! I will be doing one of my favorite presentations: my session on networking!

Albany SQL Saturday is going virtual this year. It will be held on July 25 via an online forum to be determined (connection information will be released as we get closer to the date).

To ensure that you receive information about this event, register on the website.

We’ll see you online in July!

Networking your business

As I come up on two months of my LLC being in business, I’m learning a lot of things as I go along. A lot of it is the boring administrative stuff that comes with running your own business. But another thing I’m finding out is how critical it is to network when running your own business.

As of today, I currently have two clients, and I’m hoping to pick up some more. What’s important is how I got those clients. I got them both by networking. One was a friend with whom I worked at a previous job, while the other was introduced to me through a mutual friend. To me, this drives home the point of just how critical networking can be if you’re running your own business.

I started looking into business networking resources, and came across this article. Of course, the article lists groups such as BNI (which, I understand, is a very good group; however, I’m not sure if I’m ready to pay the steep membership fee just yet. Maybe at some point down the road, when I’m better established). It also lists groups that didn’t occur to me, such as the local Chamber of Commerce, Rotary, and Kiwanis. I also found a link for local Meetup groups (this link lists groups local to me here in the Albany, NY area; you might want to check similar groups for where you’re located). I am going to make it a point to look into these resources and see if I can tap into them.

I also spoke to a friend who also has his own consulting business about possibly establishing some kind of relationship that would be mutually beneficial to both of our businesses. While neither of us had work for the other, we agreed that some kind of business relationship could be beneficial for both of us. We might look into something later down the line.

Of course, there are the other resources that I’ve been preaching all along, such as user groups and conferences.

I’ve written before about how important networking is for an individual’s career. I’m also discovering that networking is important for business as well. It might very well be key for keeping your business afloat.

The power of a single, simple presentation — oh, the places you can go!

This morning, my Facebook memories feed told me that I did a presentation at my local user group five years ago today (this isn’t the first time I’ve written about this). I did a presentation about how to speak the language of technology to those who don’t understand it.

Little did I know at the time that that simple little presentation would end up taking me places.

I had applied to speak at our local SQL Saturday using that presentation, and I wanted to use our user group meeting as a trial run. That evening, I learned a few things about myself.

  • I enjoyed public speaking and presenting.
  • I was good at it (or so I was told).
  • I have a passion for teaching. This was not news to me, but my experience reinforced that passion.

Not only was that presentation accepted for our local SQL Saturday, I have since given that presentation eleven times — including at PASS Summit, and most recently, at a SQL Saturday this past February, just before the COVID-19 crisis hit.

Since I did my presentation at my local user group five years ago, I’ve spoken at a total of twenty-three (and counting) SQL Saturdays, seven in-person user group meetings (including one that was not local), three online virtual user group presentations, a podcast, and PASS Summit. I’ve gotten the opportunity to travel and to make friends because of my experiences!

And those are just my speaking engagements. I’ve also had some other things that have happened, indirectly, because of that presentation.

  • I started a ‘blog about professional development topics (this very ‘blog that you’re reading right now).
  • I’ve gotten a better sense of my own professional skill sets and gained more confidence in them.
  • I’ve started my own business, something that I previously never thought I would ever do.
  • Even though I lost my job, I have much more confidence in my own abilities and career prospects.
  • My professional network has become much stronger.

I credit all of this to that one, simple presentation that I gave at a user group meeting five years ago today.

So consider joining a user group and doing a presentation. You never know where it could lead.