The evolution of statistics

During my lunch break, I was perusing the ESPN website and stumbled across this article. It contemplates whether or not a .300 hitter (in baseball, for those of you who are sports-challenged) is meaningful anymore. As a baseball fan, the article caught my attention. I didn’t read through the entire article (it ended up being a much longer read than I expected — too long for me to read while on a lunch break at work), but from what little I did glean from it, a couple of things struck me.

First, they talk about Mickey Mantle‘s batting average and how important hitting .300 was to him. That struck me a little funny, because (as far as I know — as I said, I didn’t get through the entire article) there was no mention of the fact that he actually finished with a batting average under .300. His career batting average was .298.

The second thing that struck me was (Yankees’ first baseman) Luke Voit saying how he felt that “feel like batting average isn’t a thing now.” Indeed, baseball is a much different game than it was, say ten, twenty, or thirty years ago. Analytics are a big part of statistics these days. A lot of stats that are prevalent now — WAR (wins above replacement), exit velocity, OPS (on-base plus slugging), etc. — didn’t even exist when I was a kid growing up, closely following my Yankees. Back when I was eating and sleeping baseball, hitting was about the triple-crown statistics — batting average, home runs, and runs batted in (RBIs). But now, we have “slash lines,” on-base percentage, slugging percentage, and so on. Even as big of a baseball fan as I am, I haven’t a clue about many of these “new age” stats. I still have no idea what WAR represents, I’m not completely sure as to what the numbers in a slash-line are, and I don’t know what constitutes a respectable OPS.

That got me thinking about how statistics have changed over the years, and whether or not that applies to statistics outside of baseball (or sports, for that matter). Maybe people who study data analytics for a living might know this better than I do, but what business statistics have a different meaning now than they did ten, twenty years ago? Are there any numbers from way back when that I should now take with a grain of salt?

I’m sure there are many examples of this outside of sports, but I struggled to come up with any. Off the top of my head, I remember how a company where I once worked made a big deal out of perfect attendance — to the point that they gave out perfect attendance awards at the end of the year. However, that had to contend with situations such as coming to work when you were sick, and so on. Do you really want someone who’s sick coming into work? These days, workplaces do not want sick people in the office, and with the advent of work-at-home provisions, perfect attendance isn’t so meaningful, anymore. (By the way, my understanding is that company no longer recognizes or rewards “perfect” attendance.)

So I suppose the takeaway is, how well do statistics age? Can they be compared with the same statistics now? What needs to be considered when analyzing statistics from years ago? It’s true that numbers often tell a story, but in order to get the full picture, you also need to understand the full context.

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CASSUG hosting the Modern Migration Tour, June 19

The Modern Migration Tour is coming to Albany!

End of support for SQL Server 2008 is almost here (ends in July!), which means it’s time to take flight on your migration strategy.

But, do you have a plan in place? What approach should you take to ensure a smooth transition?

To guide you through these questions, PASS, Microsoft, and Intel® have teamed up for a series of expert-led events, giving you all the tools you need to get to the final destination—a modern data platform.

For information about this event and to register, click here to view the EventBrite announcement. You must register on the EventBrite link to RSVP.

See you there on June 19!

Monthly CASSUG meeting — May 2019

Greetings, data enthusiasts!

This is a reminder that our May CASSUG meeting will take place on Monday, May 13, 5:30 pm, in the Datto (formerly Autotask) cafeteria!

Our guest speaker is Mike Jones! His talk is entitled: “Using Pure ActiveCluster for SQL High Availability.”

For more information, and to RSVP, go to our Meetup link at http://meetu.ps/e/GBP2c/7fcp0/f

Thanks to our sponsors, Datto/Autotask, Capital Tech Search, and CommerceHub for making this event possible!

SQL Saturday #835, Philadelphia — 5/4/19 (a week from this Saturday)

I just received an email from the organizers of SQL Saturday #835, saying that I should ‘blog about the upcoming event. Okay, I will oblige!

This is the fourth consecutive year that I am speaking at Philadelphia SQL Saturday, and they’ve all been fun experiences! (Last year, I even wrote an article in which I documented my trip!)

This year, I will be doing my presentation on tech writing and documentation.

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Chewie says, “May the 4th be with you at SQL Saturday!”

And… because this year’s Philadelphia SQL Saturday falls on May 4, attendees are encouraged to wear their favorite Star Wars garb. Yes, I intend to participate. No, I’m not saying how. You’ll just have to wait until May 4 to find out!

So if you’re interested in databases, data science, technology, professional development, or just want to hang out with a bunch of computer geeks, and you’re in southeastern Pennsylvania or southern New Jersey a week from Saturday, go register on their site, and we’ll see you there. May the fourth be with you!

Security: Close isn’t good enough!

I am reblogging an article written by my friend, Greg Moore. Hopefully, we all have our data locked down, but I felt that what he wrote was important enough that it was worth passing along.

greenmountainsoftware

I was going to write about something else and just happened to see a tweet from Grant Fritchey that prompted a change in topics.

I’ve written in the past about good and bad password and security polices. And yes, often bad security can be worse than no security, but generally no security is the worst option of all.

Grant’s comment reminded me of two incidents I’ve been involved with over the years that didn’t end well for others.

In the first case, during the first dot-com bubble, I was asked to partake in the due diligence of a company we were looking to acquire. I expected to spend a lot of time on the project, but literally spent about 30 minutes before I sent an email saying it wasn’t worth going further.

Like all dot-com companies, they had a website. That is after all, sort of a requirement to…

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Monthly CASSUG meeting — April 2019

Greetings, data enthusiasts!

This is a reminder that our April CASSUG meeting will take place on Monday, April 8, 5:30 pm, in the Datto (formerly Autotask) cafeteria!

Our guest speaker is Monica Rathbun!  Her talk is entitled: Performance Tuning, Getting the Biggest Bang for Your Buck!

Note that our meeting location has moved!  Datto/Autotask is now located at 33 Tech Valley Drive.  Please do not map this address at this time, as most online maps have not yet been updated. Drive past the old building all the way to the end, where the new building is located! Refer to the map below for the new location.

For more information, and to RSVP, go to our Meetup link at http://meetu.ps/e/FWkVd/7fcp0/f

Thanks to our sponsor, Datto/Autotask, for making this event possible!

SQL Saturday Boston BI — this Saturday, March 30

This coming Saturday, March 30, I will be speaking at SQL Saturday #813, Buston (BI Edition)! This is my first SQL Saturday for 2019, and it will be the third time since last September that I will be speaking in the Microsoft facility in Burlington, MA!

I will be doing my presentation on how to talk to non-techies, called “Whacha just say? Talking technology to non-technical people.”

SQL Saturday is always a great time! It’s a great opportunity for free training, and it’s also a great networking event — you have an opportunity to meet a number of SQL Server and other data industry experts, as well as a chance to meet other peers within your profession!

Hope to see you in Burlington this Saturday!