#SQLSaturday NYC — I’m speaking, I’m speaking, I’m speaking! #SQLSat912

Image result for manhattan skyline

The schedule for SQL Saturday #912 in New York City (Saturday, October 5) was released this morning, and I’m on it — not once, not twice, but three times!

I am scheduled to do the following three (!!!) presentations:

Looking at this schedule brings up a myriad of thoughts for me.

  • I don’t ever remember doing three presentations in a single day at any single event in my life. So I’m venturing into uncharted territory here!
  • Without fail, I absolutely love any SQL Saturday I attend! Also without fail, I am nearly always wiped out at the end of each one. I can only imagine how tired I’m going to be at the end of this one. At least I can sleep on the train ride home!
  • I purposely scheduled a late train home that night after the event so that I can get a decent dinner down in the City. I figure a couple of drinks during dinner might be in order that night!
  • My brother, who lives in Queens, has his birthday a few days before the event. I’m hoping to make it a birthday dinner for him that night!
  • To his credit, Thomas Grohser, who is one of the co-organizers for the event, emailed me asking if I was okay with doing three presentations. I sent him back a two-word reply: “challenge accepted!”
  • I was very happy to see that, as we requested, Matt Cushing and I have our networking sessions (titled Networking 101 and Networking 102, respectively) scheduled back-to-back! Go check out Matt’s session; it’s a good one!
  • If there’s any downside to doing three presentations, it’s that I likely won’t be able to attend other presentations that interest me. I do intend to attend Matt’s session (I need to keep my streak going, after all), and I’ll need to check the schedule to see what other sessions I want to attend (if I can).
  • Of all the SQL Saturdays I’ve ever attended, I’ve attended New York City the most often. For several years, including the first one I ever attended, I only attended NYC SQL Saturday. So for me, being chosen to selected to speak for NYC is special to me.
  • When I spoke here last year, I had an opportunity to get breakfast at Ellen’s Stardust Diner. It was right next to my hotel and right on my way to the Microsoft office (where SQL Saturday NYC is held). I managed to get there early enough to beat the tourist crowd. This year, I am once again staying in a nearby hotel (only a block away from where I stayed last year). I’m hoping to get there for breakfast again. Yes, I know it’s a tourist trap, but the singing wait staff is something else! You need to check it out at least once!

I can probably keep writing more thoughts, but at this point, work beckons! In any case, if you’re interested in attending NYC SQL Saturday on October 5, go to their web site and register for the event!

And come see me present — three times!

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SQL Saturday #855, Albany — the debrief

This past weekend, we (the CASSUG user group) hosted our sixth SQL Saturday. I’ve attended dozens of SQL Saturdays, but the ones that we hold in my own backyard are always the most special to me. This is one of my favorite events of the entire year, and I look forward to it each summer.

At the speaker’s dinner on Friday night!

I’ll start by talking about my own presentations, which took place in the afternoon (I was scheduled for the last two time slots of the day). My first talk was a lightning talk about business cards. (If you want to know about what I presented, check out my ‘blog article — it pretty much outlines what I talked about.) Mine was one of seven talks, along with talks by Bryan Cafferky, Andy Yun, Deborah Melkin, Michelle Gutzait, Taiob Ali, and Paresh Motiwala. Besides my own talk, I was able to catch the first five talks (unfortunately, I had to leave to prepare for my presentation, so I missed Paresh’s — but that’s okay, because he gives a terrible talk, anyway*), and I can tell you that every one of them was an awesome presentation. I loved every single one of them.

(*ed note: I’m kidding, Paresh! You know I love you!)

I get ready to do my presentation

All kidding aside… immediately after the lightning talks session, I had my own full-length presentation to do. I debuted a brand-new presentation about ‘blogging. For the most part, it went well, but it isn’t perfect. I did get a couple of comments back saying that they were expecting more about the career aspect of ‘blogging. Apparently, they were looking for a direct link between ‘blogging and career. The idea of my presentation is that ‘blogging can enhance your professional profile and well-being, but apparently, that didn’t come across in my presentation. I’m scheduled to give this talk again in Providence next month, so I’ll have to figure out what tweaks I need to make between now and then.

Other than that, I attended two other sessions: Matt Cushing’s networking presentation, and Thomas Grohser’s interviewing presentation. I’ve attended both presentations before, and they are both great sessions; if you ever have a chance to attend either presentation, I recommended them highly! Tom asked me to attend his; when I attended his previous sessions, he liked my questions and commentary so much that he asked me to come back to ask the same questions and make the same comments — for the benefit of others in attendance. For Matt’s session, it was more a matter of personal pride. He has given the presentation (I think it’s been) six times, and I have been to all six! It’ll be seven for seven next month; he’s coming back to Albany to give his presentation at our user group meeting!

SQL Saturday isn’t possible without the help of volunteers!

I had to skip out on the second round of sessions to pick up more ice (which was especially critical, since it was the hottest day of the year so far). I didn’t just speak at Albany SQL Saturday; I also served as a volunteer. As I’ve written before, SQL Saturday is an all-volunteer event, and they wouldn’t be possible without all the volunteers who do the behind-the-scenes dirty work, such as setting up, manning the registration tables, making coffee, cleaning up, assembling attendee bags, and all the little things that help make the event go (such as picking up more ice for the coolers). Volunteers are the unsung heroes of SQL Saturday, so if you ever attend an event, make sure that you show them your appreciation!

A few of us went out for ice cream after the speaker’s dinner!

There were many other aspects of SQL Saturday that made it fun — and are among the many reasons why it is one of my favorite events of the year! I didn’t even mention the speaker’s dinner on Friday night, the after-party on Saturday after it was all over, and the great time I had with many friends whom I often only get to see at these events!

SQL Saturday is a lot of hard work and effort, but it is well worth it! It isn’t just about the data sessions and free training; it’s also about networking, talking to vendors, making friends, and having fun! If you ever get to a SQL Saturday near you, I highly recommend it!

Ransomware and DevOps

Another post by Steve Jones that I think is really important…

Voice of the DBA

Ransomware.

A scary topic and one attack that is apparently more common than I suspected. Before you go further, if you haven’t restored a database backup in the last month, stop and go verify your DR plan works. That’s one of the overconfident issues facing lots of government and businesses. While this might not help your entire organization, at least you’ll have some confidence in your process and that you can recover a database.

This is a great article from Ars Technica and worth reading: A take of two cities: Why ransomware will just get worse. I’d recommend you read it and think about a few things. First, do you have insurance because things (or substitute your own word here) happen? Second, have you really tested a DR plan for some sort of software issue like this? You might think about a way to restore systems in an air-gapped…

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July 20 — SQL Saturday, Albany, NY

On Saturday, July 20 (one week from tomorrow), the Capital Area SQL Server User Group (CASSUG) will host SQL Saturday for the sixth time in Albany, NY!

For those of you who are not regular readers of my ‘blog, SQL Saturday is a daylong conference centered mostly (but not entirely) around data topics related to SQL Server. It’s also a great networking event, and an opportunity to hook up with a number of data professionals! Check out the schedule to see what sessions interest you!

And yes, I am presenting, too! I will do a brand-new presentation about ‘blogging, as well as a lightning talk about business cards! I always look forward to doing presentations in my own backyard!

Additionally, there are three pre-con sessions on Friday, July 19. Unlike SQL Saturday, these sessions are not free, but they provide quality daylong training for specific topics at a decent price. Information about these pre-cons can also be found on the web site!

For more information and to register for the event, visit our website! Upstate New York is a great place to visit during the summertime! Hope to see you there!

PASS Summit — I’ll see you in Seattle!!!

Yesterday, I received an exciting piece of news! (I wasn’t allowed to publicly announce this until it was posted on the site today, so holding back this announcement was a little like holding back a dam break!)

I found out that I will be speaking at PASS Summit!

For those of you not familiar with PASS and SQL Saturday, PASS Summit is a VERY big deal!!! I’ve heard it described as “the Super Bowl of SQL Saturdays” and “SQL Saturday on steroids.” Essentially, it represents a nationwide convention of data professionals all gathered in the same place for a week!

For my very first PASS Summit presentation, I will be doing… my very first presentation! I will do my presentation about talking the language of technology to non-technical people. This is my original presentation, going all the way back to coming up with the idea during a user group meeting in 2015. It’s come a long way since then!

Now that it’s official, I can start making my travel plans! I’ll see you in Seattle in November!

Monthly CASSUG Meeting — July 2019

Greetings, data enthusiasts!

This is a reminder that our July CASSUG meeting will take place on Monday, July 8, 5:30 pm, in the Datto (formerly Autotask) cafeteria!

We will have lightning talks for our July meeting!  For more information, and to RSVP, go to our Meetup link at http://meetu.ps/e/GBPnC/7fcp0/f

Thanks to our sponsors, Datto/Autotask, Capital Tech Search, and CommerceHub for making this event possible!

Hope to see you there!

The evolution of statistics

During my lunch break, I was perusing the ESPN website and stumbled across this article. It contemplates whether or not a .300 hitter (in baseball, for those of you who are sports-challenged) is meaningful anymore. As a baseball fan, the article caught my attention. I didn’t read through the entire article (it ended up being a much longer read than I expected — too long for me to read while on a lunch break at work), but from what little I did glean from it, a couple of things struck me.

First, they talk about Mickey Mantle‘s batting average and how important hitting .300 was to him. That struck me a little funny, because (as far as I know — as I said, I didn’t get through the entire article) there was no mention of the fact that he actually finished with a batting average under .300. His career batting average was .298.

The second thing that struck me was (Yankees’ first baseman) Luke Voit saying how he felt that “feel like batting average isn’t a thing now.” Indeed, baseball is a much different game than it was, say ten, twenty, or thirty years ago. Analytics are a big part of statistics these days. A lot of stats that are prevalent now — WAR (wins above replacement), exit velocity, OPS (on-base plus slugging), etc. — didn’t even exist when I was a kid growing up, closely following my Yankees. Back when I was eating and sleeping baseball, hitting was about the triple-crown statistics — batting average, home runs, and runs batted in (RBIs). But now, we have “slash lines,” on-base percentage, slugging percentage, and so on. Even as big of a baseball fan as I am, I haven’t a clue about many of these “new age” stats. I still have no idea what WAR represents, I’m not completely sure as to what the numbers in a slash-line are, and I don’t know what constitutes a respectable OPS.

That got me thinking about how statistics have changed over the years, and whether or not that applies to statistics outside of baseball (or sports, for that matter). Maybe people who study data analytics for a living might know this better than I do, but what business statistics have a different meaning now than they did ten, twenty years ago? Are there any numbers from way back when that I should now take with a grain of salt?

I’m sure there are many examples of this outside of sports, but I struggled to come up with any. Off the top of my head, I remember how a company where I once worked made a big deal out of perfect attendance — to the point that they gave out perfect attendance awards at the end of the year. However, that had to contend with situations such as coming to work when you were sick, and so on. Do you really want someone who’s sick coming into work? These days, workplaces do not want sick people in the office, and with the advent of work-at-home provisions, perfect attendance isn’t so meaningful, anymore. (By the way, my understanding is that company no longer recognizes or rewards “perfect” attendance.)

So I suppose the takeaway is, how well do statistics age? Can they be compared with the same statistics now? What needs to be considered when analyzing statistics from years ago? It’s true that numbers often tell a story, but in order to get the full picture, you also need to understand the full context.