Monthly CASSUG meeting — May 2019

Greetings, data enthusiasts!

This is a reminder that our May CASSUG meeting will take place on Monday, May 13, 5:30 pm, in the Datto (formerly Autotask) cafeteria!

Our guest speaker is Mike Jones! His talk is entitled: “Using Pure ActiveCluster for SQL High Availability.”

For more information, and to RSVP, go to our Meetup link at http://meetu.ps/e/GBP2c/7fcp0/f

Thanks to our sponsors, Datto/Autotask, Capital Tech Search, and CommerceHub for making this event possible!

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Birth of a user group

At SQL Saturday in New York City yesterday, I debuted a brand-new presentation: So you want to be a SQL Saturday speaker?  Although only two people showed up, they were very receptive and engaging, which is exactly what I want out of my presentations.  As someone once said, the size of the audience doesn’t matter; just play your best.

What I found fascinating, however, was the interaction between the two gentlemen.  Both were from Long Island.  They traded contact information, and started discussing the idea of creating a SQL user group around there.

It brought to mind a memory from eight years earlier.  It was in 2010.  I was traveling down to New York for my very first SQL Saturday.  I had exchanged messages with someone on a SQLServerCentral.com forum about the conference; he was also coming from the Albany area, and was attending the same conference.  We met on the train, we talked, and we discussed the idea of creating a user group in the Albany area.

The gentleman was Dan Bowlin.  Our forum conversation from eight years ago is still on SSC, and can be found here.  We became friends, and we still remain friends to this day (although Dan no longer lives in the Albany area; he took a job down in Connecticut a couple of years ago).  The group we ended up founding is now CASSUG (Capital Area SQL Server User Group).  We didn’t know what we were getting into with our initial foray into this endavor, but CASSUG now has a few hundred members, holds meetings every month, and hosts its own SQL Saturday (our next one is coming up in July).  From a simple beginning, a user group was born!

I’ve written before about the benefits of user groups.  I’m hoping that this dialog between these two gentlemen leads to the creation of another one.  And I hope to hear about meetings for the Long Island SQL Server User Group (LISSUG) sometime soon!

Maybe they’ll even invite me down as a guest speaker sometime!

Support your local user group

I’m involved with a number of local groups.  I participate regularly with my local SQL Server user group and my local Albany UX group.  I occasionally attend events held by my local college alumni group.  And I hold a leadership position within the local community symphonic band with which I play.  Additionally, there are several other local groups with which I would like to be involved; only lack of time keeps me from getting involved with more of them.

Why is it important to get involved with local user groups?  There are many good reasons.

  1. It’s a free resource for learning.  Both my SQL and UX groups regularly include a presentation about some topic at their meetings.  These presentations provide me with an opportunity to learn something new.
  2. It’s an opportunity for you to get involved and to give back to the community.  I am a musician in my spare time.  My involvement with music groups give me a chance to share my talents with the rest of the world.  Likewise, I’ve become a presenter with my SQL group (more on that in a minute).  Through my user group, I have an opportunity to share my knowledge and my thoughts.
  3. It’s an opportunity to grow.  Years ago, I started attending SQL Saturday, a series of SQL-centric technical conferences that are held at various locations.  I wanted to contribute to these conferences, but I wasn’t sure how.  I gave some presentations at my local SQL group.  I took those presentations, submitted them to SQL Saturday conferences, and was accepted.  I now regularly submit to and speak at SQL Saturdays around the Northeast United States.
  4. It’s a chance to network and make new friends.  I have made a significant number of friends through my involvement with user groups.  These are people with whom I feel comfortable getting together, having dinner, inviting to parties, playing games, going to ballgames, and so on.  From a professional perspective, it’s also a great opportunity to network.  It’s entirely possible that user group involvement could lead to professional opportunities and job leads.  You never know.  Speaking of professional opportunities and job leads…
  5. It looks good on a resume.  Getting involved with user groups demonstrates that you are genuinely interested in something.  That’s something that might appeal to potential employers.
  6. You become involved with something bigger than yourself.  Doesn’t it feel good to be part of a team?  When you’re involved with a user group, you can point to it and proudly say, “I’m a part of that!”
  7. It’s fun!  I’ve often told my wife that band practice “isn’t just a hobby; it’s therapy.”  I’ve often gone to rehearsal angry about something, and by the end of rehearsal, I’ll completely forget about what it is that upset me.  These user groups are something I enjoy, and it makes for great therapy.

These are some of the reasons.  Are there any others?  Feel free to add by commenting!

So go out there, find a user group that interests you, and get involved.  Chances are that it might lead to something.  You never know!