Archiving my talks, part 3: PASS Summit — #PASS

With the imminent demise of PASS, I figured I should take Steve Jones‘ advice and archive my presentation links.

I spoke at PASS Summit in 2019 (in Seattle) and 2020 (virtually). Naturally, I wanted to get as much as I could from my sessions from those two events.

Unfortunately, it appears that the pages from 2019 are no more. Even the pass.org/summit/2019 URL goes to the 2020 Virtual Summit page, not 2019. So, unfortunately, it appears that many (not all — see below) references to PASS Summit 2019 are lost forever.

However, it appears that the 2020 PASS Virtual Summit page appears to still be active (until next week), so I figured I should grab whatever I could from my presentation.

Alas, getting material from the PASS Summit page is not as straightforward as from the SQL Saturday pages. Unlike the SQL Saturday pages, I did not see a “create PDF” option for the schedule. I did grab screen captures for both my speaker’s description page and my presentation session page (as seen below).

My 2020 PASS Summit speaker’s page
My 2020 PASS Summit session page

I mentioned that just about all references to 2019 PASS Summit appear to be gone. One thing I did manage to download from 2019 was my session recording. Like my virtual group recordings, I took my recording and uploaded it to my personal YouTube. You can view my 2019 PASS Summit presentation here.

I did not do the same with my 2020 presentation. As I mentioned, I ended up having technical issues with my presentation, so I elected not to download it. (Steve Jones suggested that I re-record it and upload it to the PASS Summit site, but that was before PASS announced they were shutting down. I don’t see the point of doing it now.)

At the moment, I believe that takes care of most of my speaking archive. (There’s also the links to my in-person user group talks, but those are archived on Meetup, and are controlled by individual user groups, not PASS, so they’re not as urgent.) I’ll keep poking around to make sure I haven’t missed anything,.

Archiving my talks, part 2: Presentation videos — #PASS

With the imminent demise of PASS, I figured I should take Steve Jones‘ advice and archive my presentation links.

I’ve done a few presentations for the PASS Professional Development Virtual Group. Of those presentations, two of them were recorded to the group’s YouTube channel.

Because the channel lives on YouTube and not PASS, I have no idea whether or not it will disappear when PASS does. Nevertheless, I decided I didn’t want to find out. Better to be safe.

I downloaded the two recordings that I did for the PASS virtual group and reuploaded them to my own personal YouTube channel. Even if PASS decides to drop the channel, the videos will continue to live on my own channel.

So, at the moment, I currently have three PASS-related presentations on my personal YouTube channel.

Links to these videos are also available on my presentations page. Note that my Professional Development Virtual Group presentations still point to the PASS YouTube channel videos, but if PASS decides to drop the channel, I’ll change the links to point to the videos on my own channel, where they’ll live indefinitely.

Blogging virtual presentation — January 21

A couple of weeks ago, I mentioned that another virtual presentation was in the works. Well, it’s been scheduled!

I will be doing my ‘blogging presentation at noon, EST, on Tuesday, January 21!

Use this link for more information and to register! Feel free to join me!

No events near you? Try a virtual group — or start your own!

As I’m writing this, I’m sitting in on a webinar by Matt Cushing called Networking 102: Getting Ready for a SQL Event. (It was originally named “Networking 101,” but I guess he didn’t want it to conflict with mine! 🙂 ) This is actually the same session that I attended at Washington, DC SQL Saturday, and Matt does a great job! He even acknowledged me during his presentation today — thanks for the shout-out, Matt! If you ever have a chance to attend his session at a SQL Saturday, I highly recommend it!

Matt also mentioned, at the end of his virtual presentation, that it was a different experience. I concur — when I did my own a couple of weeks ago, I had to make some adjustments. I won’t get into that now — that’s another article for another time.

Watching his online presentation — and thinking back to my own from a couple of weeks ago — reminded me about the difficulty of attending events. I always encourage people to attend events such as SQL Saturday and a local user group. However, not everyone is able to do so. Maybe there isn’t a user group or event near you, or maybe an event you want to attend conflicts with something else on your calendar. Having grown up in the rural Catskills, I can understand how difficult it can be to attend some events, and I’ve had to pass on attending several events because of schedule conflicts.

Fortunately, for people in those situations, there are options.

First, since I started writing this article about a webinar, look into joining a virtual user group. PASS has a number of virtual groups available to join. I am a member of the Professional Development Virtual Group; as someone who does professional development presentations, I look into attending online presentations by this group; I’ve even done one myself, and I hope that I’m able to do more. Other virtual groups are available; do a Google search and see what groups might interest you.

Of course, there are some disadvantages to virtual groups. Because you’re generally only interacting with the presenter, networking and face-to-face interaction is impossible, so it’s difficult to connect with other people.

If you are in an area that doesn’t have a local user group that interests you, why not start one? The Albany SQL group started out with me meeting Dan Bowlin aboard a train while heading to a SQL Saturday in 2010. Since then, our group has grown in number (I’m not sure exactly how many, but last I checked, we’ve been sending emails to around 300-something people) with meetings each month, we have members who are actively involved with PASS and SQL Saturday, and we even host our own SQL Saturday each year. If you find that people in your geographic area share a common interest, consider starting a user group.

If your involvement with user or special interest groups is limited, either by time or geography, consider either joining a virtual group or starting your own user group. Those constraints shouldn’t leave you out of the loop.