Paying it forward

Once upon a time, I wanted to be the rockstar in pretty much anything and everything I did, whether it was my job, my extracurricular activities, or my relationships.  I wanted the glory and the recognition.  More importantly, I wanted to be respected for whatever I did.  In my youth, I thought that demonstrating that I was good at whatever I did was the path to glory.

But now that I’m older, that perspective has changed.  I no longer need (or, sometimes, even want) to be the rockstar.  These days, I get a great deal of satisfaction out of helping someone else become the rockstar. While I still try to perform well in whatever I do, it’s more important to me to help everyone around me be better.

This has become a passion of mine. It’s why I’m so passionate about speaking at SQL Saturday. It’s why I take such an interest in technical communication, writing, training, and mentoring. It’s why I continually encourage people to be better. It’s even one of the major reasons why I maintain my ‘blog. While it’s important to make myself better in whatever I do, I think it’s also equally important to make people around you better as well.

I’ve had a number of opportunities to give something back. For the past couple of years, I’ve taken part in a program by my alma mater, Syracuse University, specifically the College of Engineering and Computer Science (ECS).  They sponsor a “job shadow” program in which current students are paired with alumni working in various industries. The program typically takes place during winter break, between the fall and spring semesters.

Unfortunately, I work in a data-secure office, so an office shadow tends to be out of the question. (I don’t think students would really be interested in seeing me sit at a desk all day, anyway.)  In lieu of a job shadow, the university suggests other ways to interact with students — over a cup of coffee, lunch, and so on. For the past couple of years, I’ve offered to take students out to dinner. It offers a nice, relaxed atmosphere to chat, not to mention that, since I usually don’t have any commitments after dinner, I’m not constrained by time; I don’t have to worry about being back in the office by a certain time.

I’ve found numerous other ways to pay it forward. During one unemployment stint, I found a part-time position as an instructor at a local business school to hold myself over. I discovered that I enjoyed teaching so much that, even after I found gainful full-time employment, I continued with the teaching job for a few more years. I am heavily involved with my local SQL user group. By giving back to my user group, I can help other people with the same interests. I also wrote a while back about some of my networking activities in which I was able to give back. When you network, you have multiple avenues in which you can pay it forward.

As an old saying goes, a rising tide lifts all boats. Improvement doesn’t just mean making yourself better. It also means making everyone around you better as well. When you help other people succeed, then we all succeed.

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Want to learn about a topic? Try writing about it

Every now and then, I’ll peruse the forums on SSC.  In addition to people answering questions about SQL Server, there also tends to be some banter, which is probably not unusual in many forums of this nature.  One of the comments I’ve seen time and again is something like, “I learn more about subjects by answering people’s comments on these forums.”

There is more truth to this statement than people realize.  In my experience in writing about technology, I often find that I end up learning about the technology about which I’m writing — sometimes to the point of becoming a subject matter expert.

Several years ago, I taught part-time at a local business school (roughly equivalent to community college level).  I taught primarily general mathematics and a few computer classes.  I was once asked to fill in for another instructor who taught statistics.  My problem: I didn’t know much about statistics.  So, I read up on it (along with the syllabus that I would be teaching that day).  I wanted to at least be able to sound like I knew what I was talking about.  As it turned out, by teaching that class, I actually learned something about it.  The students were not the only ones who got an education that day.

The other day, I began writing a draft article regarding a subject about which I’d like to learn more: BI (edit: the now-finished article can be seen here.).  I’ve dabbled in BI a little bit; I worked a previous job where I was asked to perform some data analysis (which is how I learned about cubes and pivot tables), and I took a course in decision-support systems in grad school.  I’m seeing more SQL Saturday presentations about BI; indeed, there are even SQL Saturday conferences dedicated to BI topics (usually indicated by the words “BI Edition”).  It is a topic about which I do have some interest, and it’s something about which I’d like to learn more.

My friend, Paresh Motiwala, who was one of the organizers for SQL Saturday Boston BI Edition a while back, encouraged me to apply to speak at the event.  I said to him at the time, “the only thing I know about BI is how to spell it!”  (His response: “Hey, you know how to spell SQL!”)  On hindsight, I probably should have applied; it turns out that even BI Edition conferences accept professional development topics, under which nearly all of my presentations (so far) are categorized.

So if I claim to know so little about BI, why did I decide to start writing about it?  Well, I’m trying to learn about it, and I’d like to pass along what I learn.  But, I want to place a greater emphasis on the first part of that statement: I’m trying to learn about it.  Writing about it makes me learn something about it a little more in-depth.  And by doing so, I discover that I have a better grasp of the topic.

Hopefully, relatively soon, you’ll see an article from me about BI.  Hopefully, I’ll have learned enough writing about it that you’ll be able to learn something from me.  And hopefully, I’ll have demonstrated that I’m learning something new, and improving myself in the process.

If you want to learn something new, try teaching it or writing about it.  You’ll be surprised how much you, yourself, learn in the process.

Humble beginnings

Once again, the Facebook “On This Day” memory feature shows it can be a curious thing.  And again, this is one I wanted to share.

The picture you see above showed up on my Facebook memories feed this morning.  Three years ago today, I gave a presentation at my local SQL Server user group meeting.  I had come up with a presentation idea that I thought would be of interest to my user group, as well as other technical professionals.  I jotted down some notes, put it into a presentation, and presented it at my local user group.

About a month later, I gave this very same presentation at our local SQL Saturday.  It was my first SQL Saturday presentation!

I was curious as to how other events would take to my presentation.  Later that year, I submitted it to, and was accepted at, another SQL Saturday.  It was my second time speaking at SQL Saturday, my first time speaking at an event in “foreign territory,” and my first SQL Saturday — speaking or attending — outside of New York State.

Since that humble beginning, I’ve spoken at 13 (soon to be 14) SQL Saturdays at seven different cities around the northeastern United States.  Thanks to this endeavor, I’ve traveled around the region, met a lot of great people, expanded my professional profile, started a ‘blog (that you’re reading right now!), enhanced my career, gained more confidence, improved my presentation skills, and become a better person.  This all came about because of these conferences and from this simple start three years ago.

I hope I’ll be doing many more!  Happy three year anniversary to me!