Archiving my talks, part 3: PASS Summit — #PASS

With the imminent demise of PASS, I figured I should take Steve Jones‘ advice and archive my presentation links.

I spoke at PASS Summit in 2019 (in Seattle) and 2020 (virtually). Naturally, I wanted to get as much as I could from my sessions from those two events.

Unfortunately, it appears that the pages from 2019 are no more. Even the pass.org/summit/2019 URL goes to the 2020 Virtual Summit page, not 2019. So, unfortunately, it appears that many (not all — see below) references to PASS Summit 2019 are lost forever.

However, it appears that the 2020 PASS Virtual Summit page appears to still be active (until next week), so I figured I should grab whatever I could from my presentation.

Alas, getting material from the PASS Summit page is not as straightforward as from the SQL Saturday pages. Unlike the SQL Saturday pages, I did not see a “create PDF” option for the schedule. I did grab screen captures for both my speaker’s description page and my presentation session page (as seen below).

My 2020 PASS Summit speaker’s page
My 2020 PASS Summit session page

I mentioned that just about all references to 2019 PASS Summit appear to be gone. One thing I did manage to download from 2019 was my session recording. Like my virtual group recordings, I took my recording and uploaded it to my personal YouTube. You can view my 2019 PASS Summit presentation here.

I did not do the same with my 2020 presentation. As I mentioned, I ended up having technical issues with my presentation, so I elected not to download it. (Steve Jones suggested that I re-record it and upload it to the PASS Summit site, but that was before PASS announced they were shutting down. I don’t see the point of doing it now.)

At the moment, I believe that takes care of most of my speaking archive. (There’s also the links to my in-person user group talks, but those are archived on Meetup, and are controlled by individual user groups, not PASS, so they’re not as urgent.) I’ll keep poking around to make sure I haven’t missed anything,.

Archiving my talks, part 2: Presentation videos — #PASS

With the imminent demise of PASS, I figured I should take Steve Jones‘ advice and archive my presentation links.

I’ve done a few presentations for the PASS Professional Development Virtual Group. Of those presentations, two of them were recorded to the group’s YouTube channel.

Because the channel lives on YouTube and not PASS, I have no idea whether or not it will disappear when PASS does. Nevertheless, I decided I didn’t want to find out. Better to be safe.

I downloaded the two recordings that I did for the PASS virtual group and reuploaded them to my own personal YouTube channel. Even if PASS decides to drop the channel, the videos will continue to live on my own channel.

So, at the moment, I currently have three PASS-related presentations on my personal YouTube channel.

Links to these videos are also available on my presentations page. Note that my Professional Development Virtual Group presentations still point to the PASS YouTube channel videos, but if PASS decides to drop the channel, I’ll change the links to point to the videos on my own channel, where they’ll live indefinitely.

Archiving my talks, part 1: #SQLSaturday schedule PDFs — #PASS

With the imminent demise of PASS, I figured I should take Steve Jones‘ advice and archive my presentation links.

For this round, I went through all the SQL Saturday events where I spoke and downloaded the schedules. Each SQL Saturday schedule has a link to save it to PDF (there is an “Export to PDF” link at the bottom of each schedule).

I saved the PDFs to my ‘blog media and created links to them. You can download these schedules by going to my presentation schedule and clicking any link labeled “schedule PDF.”

For now, I’m only concerned with links hosted on PASS websites, such as SQL Saturday and PASS Summit (which I’ll do for the next round). I’m not as concerned (yet) with Meetup, YouTube, or podcasts I’ve done that are not hosted on PASS websites. I’ll update these links as I go along.

Requiem for #PASS — #SQLFamily

Many data professionals, myself included, are shocked and saddened by the announcement that PASS will cease operation on January 15, 2021. I’m sure that a large number of data ‘bloggers will be posting their thoughts regarding PASS’s announcement; this is only one of many such articles, I’m sure.

I know that PASS has been under a great deal of scrutiny by its members, and even I, myself, have been critical of PASS in the past. Three members of the board of directors resigned within the past few weeks, and the organization had been consulting with legal experts regarding its future.

I’ve always taken great pains to be apolitical (it’s one of my most, if not the most, hated topics to discuss). I don’t know much about any of PASS’s inner workings or governance, and quite frankly, I don’t want to know. I’m sure there’s a lot they could’ve done better, but I’ve never been privy to it. (Indeed, one frequent criticism I’ve heard has been their transparency — or lack of.)

As someone who has been a member of PASS for some time (since attending my very first SQL Saturday in New York City in 2010), I would prefer to talk about everything that PASS has given me. So I wanted to take some time to reflect on the things that PASS has done to enhance my professional career.

When I attended my first SQL Saturday (#39 in New York City back in 2010), I knew right away that I wanted to be involved and contribute to the community. The question was, how? I remember looking around at other attendees at the Microsoft office (back then, it was held next to Radio City, not at the Times Square location like it is now) and saying to myself, “these people probably know more about SQL Server than I do. What can I contribute to this organization?”

On that same trip, I met Dan Bowlin on the train heading down to the City. Along with Joe Barth, the three of us founded the Albany SQL user group. Through my association with that group, I also met Greg Moore and Ed Pollack; the three of us currently maintain the group’s leadership team. Since those humble beginnings, our user group has remained strong. We hold our own when compared to user groups in larger cities; indeed, we frequently say that we “punch above our weight.” And although Dan and Joe moved out of the area several years ago, I still remain friends with them to this day.

One evening, during one of our user group meetings, I had a thought: I’ve been adept at talking the language of technology to people who don’t understand it. Would that make for a good presentation? As that meeting progressed, I jotted some notes down; by the end of the meeting, I had enough fodder for an entire presentation. I ran my idea past a few people, including Greg and Ed. They all told me, that was a great idea! Run with it!

That idea became my very first presentation, which I first presented in 2015. Since then, I’ve presented that session at several SQL Saturdays and at PASS Summit.

I wrote previously about what happened after that first presentation. I discovered that I enjoyed presenting and attending events such as SQL Saturday. Additionally, I also noticed some subtle changes to my professional development. I found that I was passively getting better at what I did. I gained more confidence in my abilities, I became more assertive, and I was increasingly being recognized for the things I did. I even remember one manager telling me, “we recognize what you’re doing with all these conferences where you’re speaking; keep up the good work!”

I now have several presentations that I do. I have presented at numerous SQL Saturdays, PASS Summit, and a number of user groups, both in-person and virtual. I even did a podcast!

It wasn’t all about professional development. I made a number of friends through my involvement with PASS and SQL Saturday — people I likely wouldn’t have otherwise met, and whom I love dearly. In addition to my association with PASS, I’ve connected with these people through Twitter, LinkedIn, and Facebook. These people have become a part of my life, and I am as close to these people as I am to any of my family or circles of friends. And because of this, my professional network is stronger than ever.

I love to travel. I wish I could do more of it (usually, lack of time or money — and these days, the pandemic — keeps me from doing more of it). I’ve written before about my SQL Saturday (and other PASS) travels. These speaking opportunities gave me chances to visit places I don’t normally get to see, not to mention that they got me out of Dodge for a little while.

I attribute all of this as things that PASS has given me.

I’ve been thinking about whether or not it would be feasible to resurrect PASS. In addition to PASS, I am also a member of STC. Unlike PASS, STC charges dues to its members (using a tiered structure — the amount of dues you pay depends on your tier). Conceptually, STC is very similar to PASS; they are a professional organization that represents a specific profession (PASS represents data professionals; STC represents technical communicators). STC also does a number of things that PASS did not do; they have publications that they publish regularly, for example. If PASS is able to reorganize, I’m wondering if they’d be open to restructuring using a model such as STC. Of course, I suspect one of the reasons why PASS was popular was that they didn’t charge dues. If PASS is to be solvent, that might be something to consider.

I think it’s important for professionals in any field to have an organization such as PASS. They provide opportunities for networking, guidance, reference, and development that wouldn’t otherwise exist anywhere else. What PASS has done for my career and professional development is incalculable. The demise of PASS represents a big, big loss. I sincerely hope that PASS is able to come back in some way, shape, or form, and be stronger than ever in doing so.

Upcoming speaking engagements (as of 4/4/19)

I figured I was about due for an update of my speaking schedule. As of today, here are events where I am confirmed as speaking.

I’ve also applied to speak at the following events, but none of them are confirmed; there’s no guarantee that I will be speaking at any of these events. Stay tuned.

(Unfortunately, as much as I want to go, I am not applying to SQL Saturday #877, Boston, as I have a conflict with September 14.)

Additionally, these events are not yet live, but they are listed as “save the date.” I intend to apply to them once they do go live.

  • October 5: SQL Saturday, Pittsburgh

SQL Saturday events are held all across the country and around the world. I hope to be attending one near you!

Questionable administrative decisions (I’m looking at you, PASS)

It’s not often that I will call out by name a specific organization for what I deem to be questionable decision-making.  But today, I am making an exception.

Recently, the Professional Association of SQL Server (PASS — the organization that administers SQL Saturday) made a very questionable administrative decision.  In order to submit presentations to SQL Saturday events, all submitters must first register for the event.  Previously, if a speaker’s presentation is accepted for a conference, he or she was automatically registered for the event.

This decision has resulted in an outcry from people affiliated with PASS and SQL Saturday.

I’ll start with an open letter written by my friend, Steve Jones.  (Steve, by the way, is one of the people who first organized SQL Saturday several years ago.)

Tamera Clark, who administers the SQL Saturday Facebook group, also posted the following.

If you haven’t seen the “news” Pass made a huge change to the SQLSaturday sites that impacts both organizers and speakers. There has been no general announcement only to “current” event organizers.

If an event is open and their schedule is not published yet and you have submitted, speakers must REGISTER FOR THE EVENT as an attendee. Organizers can’t approve sessions until you are registered as an attendee.

As a speaker in order to submit to an event, you must register first and are prompted to do so.

*Yes this means organizers will need to contact speakers to get them to register.

*Yes this means you must register for an event and if you are considerate go back and unregister if you don’t get selected or can no longer attend.

*I’ve been told this does not register you 2x for the event.

Things I don’t know:

*What happens to the lunch status if a speaker is selected. Does it update to “compt by event”?

*As a speaker if I change my mind before the event(prior to the schedule being made) and just cancel my registration what happens?

*As a speaker if I change my mind during the process of a schedule being made (ie. session approved but not on schedule) and I cancel my registration what happens?

*As a speaker if I change my mind and the schedule is published what happens when I cancel my registration.

For organizers it looks like we might have gone back in time, now you don’t know if speakers are still attending when not selected. Inflating numbers and causing wait list issues for some.

Finally, I wrote an email to PASS, and I wanted to share it here.

To whom it may concern:

I am writing to strongly object to and to voice my extreme displeasure at PASS’s new policy about requiring speakers to register to an event in order to submit presentations.

This is an extra step that is wholly unnecessary, inconvenient, and detrimental.  All SQL Saturday speakers are volunteers.  The process for allowing speakers to submit should be made easier, not harder.  I have written ‘blog articles, and I have a SQL Saturday presentation, that encourages potential speakers to volunteer to this otherwise-noble event.  Requiring speakers to first register complicates the submission process, and may actually DISCOURAGE, not encourage, new speakers to sign up.

Additionally, if I register, and I am not selected to speak at an event, I will need to take the extra step of canceling my registration.  Number one, that adds to the inconvenience and complication.  Number two, if I should not remember to cancel (as is human nature), that is one more spot that I am denying a potential attendee who is on the waiting list.

I heard that this new policy is to enforce the terms and agreements for SQL Saturday.  This is not an acceptable solution.  If this is about terms and agreements, a more sensible solution would be to include the text along with the speaker’s registration — something along the lines of “if you are accepted to speak, understand that you accept the terms and conditions…” etc.

I strongly urge you to reconsider this policy.  Any policy that makes things difficult is more likely to discourage, not encourage, further participation.

Regards,
Raymond J. Kim
PASS Member
SQL Saturday presenter

I’ve written articles encouraging people to become speakers, as well as put together a presentation that encourages people to present.  In one fell swoop, PASS is threatening to throw that away.

If you are involved with SQL Saturday, and you are as outraged about this policy change as I (and many others) are, I encourage you to contact PASS to voice your displeasure.  By applying pressure to the organization, perhaps they will reverse course.