Getting past the first draft

“No thinking — that comes later. You must write your first draft with your heart. You rewrite with your head. The first key to writing is… to write, not to think!”

William Forrester (Sean Connery), Finding Forrester (via IMDb)

“The secret to life is editing. Write that down. Okay, now cross it out.”

William Safire, 1990 Syracuse University commencement speech

“What no wife of a writer can ever understand is that a writer is working when he’s staring out of the window.”

Burton Rascoe

“Just do it.”

Nike

I wrote before that technical writer’s block is a thing. There have been more times than I care to admit where I’ve spent a good chunk of my day just staring at the blank Word template sitting on the screen in front of me.

I recently spent time struggling with such a document. I was assigned to document one of our applications, and I have to admit that I’m having a really tough time with it. Sometimes, one of the hardest things to do in writing (or just about any other endeavor, for that matter — writing software code and songs comes to mind) is simply getting started. I got to the point where I took the advice of William Forrester/Sean Connery and Nike, whose quotes you see above, and “just did it.”

I went through the application (ed. note: see my earlier article about playing with an application) and just started grabbing a few semi-random screen captures. I pasted the screen shots into my Word document, thinking maybe they’d be valuable to use in the document somewhere later. As I went through the functionality in the application, I wrote a few descriptive comments to go along with my screen captures.

That may very well have been the spark that I needed. As I continue this exercise, I’m finding that my document is starting to gain a semblance of structure. In the back of my head, I’m starting to get an idea of how the document will be organized. At some point, I’ll take what I’ve “thrown together” and try to figure out how to make the pieces fit.

This approach doesn’t always work. There are some circumstances where you want to plan it out — you don’t want to just haphazardly throw a building together, for example. But in some cases where creativity is more important than advance planning, mindlessly trying something might just be the spark you need to get yourself going.

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