Lots of user groups to choose from

Yesterday, I received a Meetup email (I get them regularly) regarding an AWS group (that I didn’t even know existed). I, personally, don’t deal directly with AWS, but my organization does use it extensively. There is an AWS user group meeting coming up this week. I sent the announcement to my coworkers; I figured that a number of them might be interested in it.

It made me think about the plethora of user groups that are out there. I write primarily about the SQL user group with which I’m involved, but I’m also involved with a UX user group and a .NET user group. I’m also involved with a number of extracurricular activities (that, for the purposes of this discussion, I count as user groups); I play with a large symphonic concert band, I have my CrossFit gym, and this Fall, I will be music-directing a show production that’s scheduled to be on stage in December!

I will confess that I have yet to attend a .NET user group event, and there are a number of other groups that interest me. What keeps me from attending them is lack of time. It seems like there is an endless number of user groups out there, but there’s only one of me, and there’s only 24 hours in a day and seven days in a week.

I’ve written about the benefits of user groups before. It’s a great source of learning, it often doesn’t cost anything to be involved, you support a cause that is special and specific to you, and it’s an opportunity to network and make new friends. (I should also mention that it’s a great excuse to get out of the house!)

And you never know where involvement with a user group might lead!

So if you’re looking to meet people and learn new things, go out and find yourself a user group. I have no doubt that there’s one one there that suits you!

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Monthly CASSUG Meeting — September 2019

Greetings, data enthusiasts!

Our September speaker is our own Greg Moore! He will do his presentation titled: “Pocket-sized Server: SQL Server for under $200!” For additional information and to RSVP, go to our Meetup event page at https://www.meetup.com/Capital-Area-SQL-Server-User-Group/events/264169963/­

Thanks to our sponsors, Datto, Capital Tech Search, and CommerceHub, for making this event possible!

Hope to see you there!

Want to get started with speaking? Try your local user group!

Usually around this time of the month — a week before (my user group‘s) monthly meeting — I’d be posting an announcement about our upcoming meeting.

I still will do so — as soon as I find out who’s speaking.

As I write this, I’m guessing that our speaker will be Greg Moore, but I’m not completely sure. One way or another, I’ll post an announcement later today.

Which brings me to the subject of today’s article.

Have you ever wanted to speak publically or do presentations? Consider doing so at a local user group. It’s the perfect place to do so!

There are many advantages about speaking at a local user group. If you’re a first-time speaker, it’s an opportunity to practice your presentation skills. If you’ve been a part of a user group for some time, you can do so in front of a familiar audience. If it’s your first time at a particular user group, it can serve as an introduction to the group. Either way, it’s a wonderful experience that is generally less pressure than presenting for the first time at, say, a SQL Saturday.

I’ve told this story plenty of times. In 2015, I came up with a presentation idea that I first presented at my user group. I had been involved with this user group for a while, I was among friends, and I felt comfortable about presenting to this group. Ever since that initial experience, I’ve spoken at several SQL Saturdays, and this coming November, I will be doing that same presentation for PASS Summit! My experience with speaking has also passively helped my career in numerous ways, including (but not limited to) expanding my network and improving my own professional self-confidence. I’ve come a long way since that initial start!

And if you’re still not completely comfortable with speaking, but still have an interest in doing so, there are other resources available to get you started. Look into groups or courses such as Toastmasters or Dale Carnegie. (Disclosure: I have friends who are involved with Toastmasters, and I, myself, am a Dale Carnegie grad.)

If you’re interested in speaking, consider starting at your local user group. You never know where a small start could lead!

P.S. if you’d like to speak for our user group, feel free to drop us a line!

#SQLSaturday NYC — I’m speaking, I’m speaking, I’m speaking! #SQLSat912

Image result for manhattan skyline

The schedule for SQL Saturday #912 in New York City (Saturday, October 5) was released this morning, and I’m on it — not once, not twice, but three times!

I am scheduled to do the following three (!!!) presentations:

Looking at this schedule brings up a myriad of thoughts for me.

  • I don’t ever remember doing three presentations in a single day at any single event in my life. So I’m venturing into uncharted territory here!
  • Without fail, I absolutely love any SQL Saturday I attend! Also without fail, I am nearly always wiped out at the end of each one. I can only imagine how tired I’m going to be at the end of this one. At least I can sleep on the train ride home!
  • I purposely scheduled a late train home that night after the event so that I can get a decent dinner down in the City. I figure a couple of drinks during dinner might be in order that night!
  • My brother, who lives in Queens, has his birthday a few days before the event. I’m hoping to make it a birthday dinner for him that night!
  • To his credit, Thomas Grohser, who is one of the co-organizers for the event, emailed me asking if I was okay with doing three presentations. I sent him back a two-word reply: “challenge accepted!”
  • I was very happy to see that, as we requested, Matt Cushing and I have our networking sessions (titled Networking 101 and Networking 102, respectively) scheduled back-to-back! Go check out Matt’s session; it’s a good one!
  • If there’s any downside to doing three presentations, it’s that I likely won’t be able to attend other presentations that interest me. I do intend to attend Matt’s session (I need to keep my streak going, after all), and I’ll need to check the schedule to see what other sessions I want to attend (if I can).
  • Of all the SQL Saturdays I’ve ever attended, I’ve attended New York City the most often. For several years, including the first one I ever attended, I only attended NYC SQL Saturday. So for me, being chosen to selected to speak for NYC is special to me.
  • When I spoke here last year, I had an opportunity to get breakfast at Ellen’s Stardust Diner. It was right next to my hotel and right on my way to the Microsoft office (where SQL Saturday NYC is held). I managed to get there early enough to beat the tourist crowd. This year, I am once again staying in a nearby hotel (only a block away from where I stayed last year). I’m hoping to get there for breakfast again. Yes, I know it’s a tourist trap, but the singing wait staff is something else! You need to check it out at least once!

I can probably keep writing more thoughts, but at this point, work beckons! In any case, if you’re interested in attending NYC SQL Saturday on October 5, go to their web site and register for the event!

And come see me present — three times!

PASS Summit — Making the Most of PASS Summit 2019

Last week, the PASS Professional Development Virtual Group held a webinar about making the most of PASS Summit, led by two friends of mine, Paresh Motiwala and Grant Fritchey. Unfortunately, I missed the webinar when it aired, but they did record and post the webinar to YouTube. Paresh even gives me a shout-out during the presentation, at 6:30 in the recording! (Shameless plug: come check out my session!)

Although PASS Summit is a large conference based mainly (but not entirely) around data topics, it isn’t just about attending sessions. It’s also about networking, learning, and experience. During the hour-long webinar, Paresh and Grant provide tips on how to network, convincing your manager to let you attend (PASS even includes a letter that you can give your boss!), what to expect when you attend, whom you’ll meet, how to stretch your dollar (admittedly, PASS Summit is not cheap to attend), talking with vendors, and so on.

I’ll leave it to you check out the link and leave it to Paresh and Grant to compel you to attend PASS Summit. They do a great job with the webinar, and I encourage you to check it out. It is definitely worth the hour of your time. Watching the video makes me even more excited about attending! Maybe it might be enough to talk you into attending PASS Summit!

Hope to see you in Seattle in November!

The case for non-local user groups

Ever buy something online, then become inundated by emails from that vendor? Of course you do.

I’ve attended numerous out-of-town events, mainly SQL Saturdays, and every once in a while, a user group (I spoke at one earlier this year). Of course, once I was subscribed to their mailing lists, I’d start getting email from them.

I used to unsubscribe from some of these lists (why, for example, should I maintain a mailing for the Pittsburgh user group when it’s an eight-hour drive away). But it occurred to me not long ago that maintaining these mailings might be a good idea (in fact, I might even re-subscribe to some of these mailing lists).

I’ve extolled the benefits of getting involved with your local user groups. But why would you want to bother with groups that aren’t local? Well, here are some reasons to do so.

  • You receive news about activities in that area. Of all SQL Saturdays I’ve attended, I’ve probably attended New York City‘s the most, going all the way back to 2010 (long before I became a speaker). I travel to NYC fairly often (well okay, maybe more like once in a while — not as often as I used to, but still often enough to know my way around), so events in the City (as we upstate New Yorkers refer to it) tend to interest me. Maintaining contact with the NYC user group (and others) provides me with information regarding activities in the area.
  • It’s a form of networking. Staying connected with non-local user groups expands your reach. You’ll get news and announcements from the remote group, and in turn, maintain contacts with people involved with it.
  • You can get an idea about how other groups operate. I’m heavily involved with my local user group, so I have a pretty good idea as to its inner workings. Seeing what other groups do gives us ideas that we might like to implement within our own group.
  • Are you relocating? If you’re looking for opportunities beyond your area, a user group in your location of interest may be a good place to start. You can connect with people who know the area, and you can get information regarding job opportunities, where to live, and so on.
  • If you happen to be in the neighborhood… If you’re visiting a particular location, and the user group local to that area is meeting while you’re there, why not attend? You’ll get all the benefits that I listed above (and maybe some others that didn’t occur to me). If you’re a speaker, maybe they’ll even schedule you to speak while you’re in town.

While you might not be able to attend events for a user group that is not geographically local to you, it doesn’t necessarily preclude being involved with them. Just because a user group is not nearby doesn’t mean you can’t get involved with it.

Monthly CASSUG Meeting — August 2019

Greetings, data enthusiasts!

This is a reminder that our August CASSUG meeting will take place on Monday, August 12, 5:30 pm, in the Datto (formerly Autotask) cafeteria!

Our August speaker is Matt Cushing!  He will do his presentation: “Networking 101: Getting Ready for a SQL Event!”  For additional information and to RSVP, view our Meetup event at https://www.meetup.com/Capital-Area-SQL-Server-User-Group/events/260380158/

Also, don’t forget NY Tech Loop’s Night at the Ballpark on Tuesday, August 6!  Go to https://www.meetup.com/Capital-Area-SQL-Server-User-Group/events/263584142/ for more information and instructions for purchasing tickets!

Thanks to our sponsors, Datto/Autotask, Capital Tech Search, and CommerceHub for making this event possible!

Hope to see you there!