Coming up: SQL Saturday, Rochester NY, Feb.29 #SQLSaturday #SQLSat953 #SQLSatRoc

Image result for rochester institute of technology

The other day, I received emails from the organizers for SQL Saturday Rochester (hi, Andy!) saying that I should spread the word about their upcoming event on Leap Day, February 29 (a week from this Saturday). Okay, I will oblige!

I will be speaking at Rochester SQL Saturday on February 29. The event takes place at Golisano Hall on the campus of Rochester Institute of Technology. This will be my third time speaking at Rochester SQL Saturday!

I will be doing two talks on February 29.

Additionally, there are several other great presentations given by many wonderful speakers throughout the day! Check out the schedule to give them a look!

SQL Saturday is always a good time. Come out, learn from industry professionals, and take advantage of the networking opportunities! See you in Rochester on Leap Day!

How often should I 'blog?

It seems like I haven’t been writing as many ‘blog articles as I’d like this month. There have been a number of reasons — among them, I’ve been sick, I’ve been busy, and so on, but that thought, in and of itself, got me thinking, and it actually gave me a ‘blog article idea. (It’s funny how ideas come about, sometimes.)

Last month, when I did my ‘blogging virtual presentation (if you missed it, you can view the recording of it here), I had a great question come up: how often should someone ‘blog?

To be honest, there really are no hard or fast rules as to how often you should ‘blog. I’ve known people who write maybe one article every few months. I know that Greg Moore tries to write an article each week. On the other hand, Steve Jones usually puts out at least two articles per day (when he’s not on sabbatical). For me, personally, I try to write at least one article each month, with a general target of ten articles a month. It doesn’t always happen; if you look at my archive (on the right side column of my ‘blog), you’ll notice that November and December of 2016 are skipped. That’s because I didn’t write anything those two months. By contrast, if you look at my article counts in 2019, I averaged a little over 13 articles each month. I guess 2019 was a good year for ‘blog articles.

There’s a balance to maintain when trying to be a prolific ‘blog article writer. For starters, there’s a matter of coming up with things to write about. A lot of ideas just come to me, but there are also times when we struggle to come up with ideas. Writer’s block is a common thing. There’s also a matter of finding time to write, and balancing it with other things in your life — work, family, activities, and so on. I’ll pretty much jot things down as soon as they come to me — as I’ve learned, any time I have an idea, I either take care of it right away, or write it down. And there’s nothing that says you have to write a complete article in one sitting; you can always jot your thoughts down and come back to it later. (Of course, sometimes, “later” might not be for a couple of years, by which time your idea has become irrelevant or obsolete.)

I’ve also noticed from my WordPress analytics that there seems to be a correlation between how many articles I write and how much traffic my ‘blog gets, which, of course, makes sense. If you don’t write anything, nobody will read what you (don’t) write. (Duh!) The more you write, the more people will read.

I’ll toss out a question that I ask in my ‘blogging presentation: what do you want to get out of your ‘blog? That will likely dictate how often you should ‘blog. But ultimately, how often you ‘blog is up to you. As Tom Lehrer once said, life is like a sewer. What you get out of it depends on what you put into it.

Upcoming speaking engagements (as of 2/6/2020)

I’ve had some updates to my speaking schedule, so I figured this would be a good time to update my speaking schedule.

I am confirmed to be speaking at the following two events.

I’ve also submitted presentations to the following events, but they are not confirmed (and I might not get confirmation for at least a few weeks, if not longer).

Additionally, SQL Saturday Boston is listed for October 3, but the event is not yet live. I intend to apply once it is. I will also likely apply to speak at PASS Summit once speaker submissions are open. I will also apply to SQL Saturday events within easy driving distance of my home, such as New York City and Providence, RI.

Hopefully, I’ll see you at an event near you sometime soon!

Coming up with 'blog article ideas

Ever come up with a great topic about which to write an article? Do you have something on your mind that you want to get out of your system? Did you just learn something new and profound? Or is there some topic about which you don’t know but are trying to learn? Did you pick up some useful tidbit that you want to set aside for later use? Did you come across something you want to share?

I could keep going with this, but I’d rather not write a rambling paragraph that will eventually bore you; besides, I think you have the idea. I’d guess that one of the most common questions when trying to write a ‘blog is, “what do I write about?”

For me, personally, a lot of my ideas just pop into my head (including for this very article that you’re reading right now). If I think the idea is profound enough that it might help other people, I’ll start writing about it. Other times, I’ll come up with some idea, jot it down in a post, and save it for later. I have 100+ such draft articles; whether or not they ever see the light of day remains to be seen.

There are a number of things to consider when coming up with draft article ideas (and I dedicate several slides to this very topic in my ‘blogging presentation). If you’re trying to come up with things to write about, here are some thoughts that might help get you going.

  • What’s on my mind? It might sound obvious, but a lot of my ‘blog article ideas come from random thoughts that just happen to pop into my head. They’ll come from random sources — something I’m working on, something I’m watching, reading, or listening to, a question that someone asks, and so on. Every now and then, they’re thoughts that I think might help someone out. That can make great article fodder, so make sure you at least make a note of it. It happens more often that you might think; I’ve surprised myself at the number of ‘blog articles I’ve written that started as just random thoughts in my head.
  • I know something you don’t know — and I’m willing to share! Chris Bell, one of my friends on the SQL Saturday speakers circuit, once told me something profound, and it’s something I haven’t forgotten. He said, “an expert is someone who knows something that you don’t.”

    I’ve been a working professional for a long time now (I won’t say how long!), and I’ve learned a lot in my experience. I think I have some knowledge in at least a few subjects, and what I think can potentially help other people. Helping other people is one of my great passions, and if something that I know helps someone else, then I’ve accomplished something.
  • I just learned something new! Some people seem to have a misconception that you need to be an expert at something to write a ‘blog. Wrong! If you’re learning something new, keeping an online journal about what you learn is one of the best reasons to maintain a ‘blog! You’ll be able to see for yourself just how much you learn. Additionally, if you’re actively seeking new employment, it shows potential employers that you’re learning something, and that you have the ability to learn. Not only that, it shows off your expertise in terms of what you’ve learned. That’s something that hiring managers like to see!
  • I don’t want to forget this. Let me write it down. One of those people you could help is yourself. Matt Cushing tells a story in his networking presentation about the time he was trying to solve a problem, and he found the answer to it… in his own ‘blog! He had written an article about the very thing he was trying to solve, and found the answer in his article that he had forgotten about!

    As Matt says in his presentation, “a ‘blog can serve as your own personal Google.” A ‘blog can serve as scratch notes to yourself, and it might even help others in the process.
  • Bring people in. Don’t drive them away. You want people to read your ‘blog, don’t you? Like anyone else, I have thoughts and opinions about a lot of things, but I won’t ‘blog about a lot of them. I generally avoid any topic that’s divisive. You will almost never, if ever, see me discuss politics or religion on my ‘blog (I despise talking about politics, anyway). If I want to talk about religion, I’ll go to church. If I want to learn about politics, I’ll read The New York Times. Unless your ‘blog is specifically about those hot-button topics, they are more likely to drive people away than bring them in. I will not touch them on my ‘blog.
  • Avoid posting anything that is overly-sensitive or qualifies as “TMI,” unless it’s relevant to your topic. People generally don’t want to hear about your last trip to your gastroenterologist. Stuff like that isn’t typically what ‘bloggers write about. However, if some anecdote comes out of it — “my appointment taught me a lesson that applies to my professional life,” for example — maybe then, it’d be appropriate to write about it. However, be careful about it — make sure that what you write is appropriate for your audience. Nobody wants to read the details of your last trip to the bathroom while you had the bad case of diarrhea.
  • It’s okay to go off-topic once in a while. At the time of this article, Steve Jones of SSC is taking a sabbatical from his job (a nice little perk that he has available to him). During his time away from work, he has been ‘blogging about his daily exploits, which include skiing, learning to play guitar, and working around his ranch. I’ve been enjoying his posts, and I even told him that I was living vicariously through his posts.

    I’ll occasionally post an article that has nothing to do with my job, technical communication, or professional development. I’ll sometimes write about my extracurricular activities — my music endeavors (I play four different instruments), my workouts (I am an active Crossfitter), and so on. If you maintain a ‘blog about professional topics, it’s okay to post something off-topic now and then. It shows you have other interests, and it shows that you have a life outside of work. It shows that you’re human.

There are numerous other ways to generate ideas for ‘blog fodder. Feel free to comment below with your favorites. Hopefully, these thoughts are enough to help you get your own ‘blog going.

Albany Code Camp — April 25 @AlbanyCodeCamp #albcc

I received an email over the weekend about a new event for this year — and for once, it isn’t related to PASS or SQL Saturday.

On Saturday April 25, the first (hopefully, annual) Albany Code Camp will be held!

I submitted four of my presentations. We’ll see if any of them are selected. Stay tuned!

Regardless of whether or not I’m selected to present, I will likely make the effort to attend. Hope to see you there!

My 'blogging presentation recording is online! @CASSUG_Albany @PASS_ProfDev

Were you interested in checking out my ‘blogging virtual presentation? Were you not able to attend?

Good news! A recording of my presentation is available online! Use this link to see my presentation on YouTube!

Blogging virtual presentation — Tuesday, January 21 @CASSUG_Albany @PASS_ProfDev

Today around noon (about an hour from now as I write this), I will be doing my virtual presentation about ‘blogging! Come and join me!

Welcome to Ray Kim's 'blog

On Tuesday, January 21, at noon (US Eastern Standard Time), I will be doing my presentation titled “Blogging for Success: Advancing your career by blogging.”

If you’re interested in starting a ‘blog, I’ll talk about my own experience with ‘blogging and lessons I’ve learned along the way. Some topics I’ll discuss include how I got started, ‘blogging platforms, and subject matter.

For more information and to register for the event, use this link.

Hope to see you there (so to speak)!

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