Is it live, or is it Memorex? #PASSSummit #PASSVirtualSummit #PASSSummit2020

1974 MEMOREX 60 Cassette - NELSON RIDDLE - ELLA FITZGERALD VINTAGE AD | eBay

First things first — for the benefit of those who aren’t old enough to remember the old Memorex ads (and don’t understand the reference to this article’s title), here’s a YouTube link to a couple of their old ads. Back in those days (and yes, I am old enough to remember these ads), “is it live, or is it Memorex” was an instantly-recognized tagline, along with “Just do it,” “Have a Coke and a smile,” “Got milk?,” and “Think different” (the grammar snob in me still has a problem with that last one).

(Since cassette tapes have gone the way of the dinosaur, I wondered if Memorex even still existed. Apparently, it doesn’t; according to a Wikipedia article, the company was dissolved in 1996.)

One of the things that PASS Summit asked speakers (like me) to do was to prerecord their sessions. I remember reading something about having a backup plan in case some kind of problem came up (for example, what if my cable modem died while I was in the middle of doing my presentation). I suppose that makes sense. It’s always good to have a backup plan.

The recording was due today, so I took this afternoon to get it done. (Greg Moore recently wrote an article about PASS Summit speaker deadlines.) It turned out to be an interesting (and, surprisingly, tiring) experience.

PASS offered two options for doing this; we could either record it on our own computer and upload the file to the speaker’s resource page, or we could do it online using a video tool provided by PASS on the page. I chose the latter for a few reasons. First, video files (especially for an hourlong presentation) can get large, and I didn’t want to deal with the hassles of having to upload large files. Second, I don’t have very good video recording software (basically, just whatever comes with Windows 10), and I didn’t want to waste time trying to figure out how to record video of my presentation slides while doing my presentation.

So, I opted for using the online tool provided by PASS. I figured it was more convenient, it was already there, and I didn’t have to worry about uploading anything; whatever I recorded would already be saved on the site.

It made use of my previously-uploaded presentation slides. Part of what made it interesting was how the recording was performed. I expected it to be a single continuous recording, as though I was actually doing my presentation. That turned out not to be the case. It made me record audio and video for each individual slide. When I was finished with each slide, I would save it, and it would move on to the next one.

I can see both pros and cons to this methodology. On the plus side, I didn’t have to worry about doing an entire presentation, and not being happy with the recording. If I didn’t like what I did with a slide, it gave me the option of deleting it and starting over. (That said, I did make it a point to not obsess with being perfect; I only re-recorded serious flubs or interruptions. There were some coughs and verbal stumbles that I didn’t bother to clean up.) I didn’t have to sit continuously for an hour (although I did, anyway — more on that in a minute); I could take breaks in-between slides.

Some of those breaks ended up being timely and necessarily. At one point, my wife texted me; at another, Bernard, our tuxedo cat, meowed and scratched at the door to the home office, demanding attention!

Of course, recording individual slides had its disadvantages as well. Because stops were frequent, it took twice as long than a straight recording session to get it finished; by the time I was done, I had used up almost the entire afternoon, and I was surprised at how tired I was. Also, because I was using the built-in slide presenter, I had no control over my slides; if any of them had any animations, I could not control them.

In any case, I got it done. That’s one less thing on my speaker’s to-do checklist.

It did also get me thinking: if I prerecorded my session, do I even need to be there to do my presentation? I’ve done a couple of virtual SQL Saturdays this year, as well as a few presentations for the Professional Development Virtual Group, but they were live sessions, and I wasn’t asked to prerecord them. (A couple of my virtual group presentations were recorded and are viewable on YouTube.) If PASS uses my prerecorded session, would it matter whether or not I was actually there?

(As it turns out, even if they use it, I am required to be there for fifteen minutes of Q and A.)

As of right now, I fully expect to do this presentation live on November 13. Nevertheless, it does make me wonder; if you do tune into my presentation, will you see me live, or will you see my recording?

One thought on “Is it live, or is it Memorex? #PASSSummit #PASSVirtualSummit #PASSSummit2020

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