#SQL101: Installing #SQLServer 2019 Developer on my laptop

A while back, I wrote about installing SQL Server 2016 on my laptop. Since then, Microsoft has released SQL Server 2019. Additionally, I bought a new laptop last November; my tired old HP 4430s had served me well for several years, but it was showing its age, so I decided it was time to upgrade. Since we have updated versions of SQL Server, and I have a (still relatively) new laptop on which to install it, not to mention that I have some time with this COVID-19 isolation, I figured this would be a good time to install SQL Server 2019 on my new laptop.

Before we begin, let me start with my laptop specs. I make no claims that these are the recommended specs for SQL Server, but this is what I have.

  • HP Pavilion x360 Convertible 14m-dh1xxx
  • Intel Core i5-10210U @ 160 GHz
  • 8 GB RAM
  • Windows 10 Home Edition (it’s what came installed)
  • 129GB available disk space

I started by going to the SQL Server downloads page and downloaded the freeware version of SQL Server 2019 Developer. There are a number of versions on this page, including (among other things) a trial version of SQL Server 2019 on-premises and SQL Server 2019 on Azure (and, of course, the Express version of SQL Server). For my rather modest needs, which includes practicing SQL Server skills, writing about it from time to time, and having some fun with it, Developer version should suit my needs.

The link downloaded SQL2019-SSEI-Dev.exe to my machine. I ran the file and was greeted by a screen asking for the installation type.

I decided to use the Custom option. The lazy body in me thought about running the Basic installation type, but since I’m documenting this installation, I figured it would defeat part of the purpose.

The next screen asked where to download the media. By default, it goes to C:\SQL2019. Since most everything I download goes to my Downloads folder, I decided to switch it there. I set it to download to a SQL2019 folder within my Downloads folder. It also indicated that I would need 8.9GB free space, with a download size of 1.4GB. My new laptop doesn’t have the disk size that my old one did, but I still have plenty available, so it shouldn’t be a problem. (One thing I should note: my new laptop uses a SSD, as opposed to the traditional storage disk on my old machine.)

I clicked Install, and the install package started to download.

Once the Installer finished downloading, the SQL Server Installation Center appeared.

I ran the System Configuration Checker, and it came up cleanly. I decided to proceed with installation. I clicked the Installation tab and selected New SQL Server stand-alone installation or add features to an existing installation.

On the Product Key page, I selected Developer under free edition. The next few screens were straightforward — the only warning I saw was for my firewall — until it got to the Feature Selection screen. I went ahead and selected all features, which would take up 14GB of disk space. If you’re installing SQL Server on your own machine, you’ll need to decide what features you want to install at this point.

I went with the default instance for the instance configuration.

I selected standalone PolyBase-enabled instance. I’m using this on a standalone configuration, after all.

Since I don’t have Java installed on my machine, I used the Open JRE included with the installation. If you have Java on your machine, you’ll need to determine what instance of Java you want to use.

Under Server Configuration, I used the default service accounts. There’s a note that reads: “Microsoft recommends that you use a separate account for each SQL Server service.” I am not sure about the implications of using the default service accounts; this would be a question for someone who knows more about SQL Server than I do.

Under the Database Engine Configuration, I went with Windows authentication mode. If I was installing this under any configuration other than my own machine and login, I would not go with this option; I would use Mixed Mode and specify a SQL user account. I added myself (clicking Add Current User) as the administrator for this account. Again, this is not something I, personally, would recommend for a large-scale installation, but since I’m the only one who’ll be using this instance, and I have no intention of using this for anything other than demo, practice, and documentation purposes, I went ahead and used Windows Authentication.

I pretty much went with the defaults for the rest of the installation. I did need to consent to install R and Python. I got to the Ready to Install screen, clicked Install, and let it do its thing.

Installation was straightforward and painless. In years and installations past, I’d be writing about the errors that came up and the number of times I’d have to click or press Enter to continue with the installation, but there were no such prompts. I let it go and went off to do other things. I’m not sure how long it took — I’ll guess around twenty minutes, although it seemed longer — but when I looked again, SQL Server was installed on my laptop.

That was as far as I got for this installation. I still need to tinker with post-installation configurations, including SSMS, SSIS, and any tools that I need to actually do something with SQL Server. That’ll likely come later when I have a chance to tinker some more.

3 thoughts on “#SQL101: Installing #SQLServer 2019 Developer on my laptop

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