Consistent code infrastructure

“Any fool can write code that a computer can understand. Good programmers write code that humans can understand.”

— Martin Fowler

I’m currently working on a project in which I’m trying to deconstruct a database. In doing so, I’ve come across a number of things about it that, in the scope of databases, appall me. Who the hell creates a relational database with no defined primary or foreign key constraints??? And this thing is in a production environment, no less! While that’s a big part of my frustration, that’s another rant for another time. For this article, I want to focus on something else.

A big part of my task — and my frustration — is trying to figure out what the data columns are and how they’re being used in the application. I did come across a table that contains data as to what primary keys are defined (I have no idea why whomever built this thing didn’t actually create the primary keys), and I’m spending a lot of time trying to figure out how these tables relate to each other. As I already mentioned, there are no foreign key relationships defined. So a lot of my time is being spent trying to figure that out.

This is where my frustration — and the purpose of this article — kicks in. Whomever built this structure used names like “DataCounter,” “CrossReferenceCounter,” and so on, to define their “primary keys.” (I put it in quotes, because, like I said, they’re not actually there. And who uses the word “counter” to define them?) What I’m finding is that the corresponding foreign key isn’t exactly the same. For example, while the entity table uses ” DataCounter” for its “primary key,” other tables reference it using ” DataIDCounter.”

This might not seem like a big deal, but when you’re trying to figure out how to map large numbers of data tables and columns, you start questioning whether or not the relationships are correct. And I came across several others whose naming conventions are even worse.

Some of you might be saying, “that’s not a big deal. What’s your problem?” Well, trying writing an ad hoc query where you type in what you think is the column name, and it turns out to be something completely different. You end up wasting your time going back to look it up and trying to figure out what it is.

I remember a previous job in which I was looking at a piece of JavaScript code that contained two nested loops. You would think that the increment counter would use words that would make some sense, right? Wrong. Whomever programmed it named the variables “dog” and “cat.”

Explain to me how that is helpful to somebody trying to troubleshoot or edit the code.

In my previous life as a developer, I would write what I referred to as “open-ended code” — that is, I wrote it with the idea that it would likely be rewritten somewhere down the line. I wanted to make it easy for me (or someone else) to go back and edit or change the code, if necessary. I like to think that other developers have this same mindset, but, all too often, I come across examples like this that tell me that that is not the case.

If you’re a developer — whether it’s for an application, website, database, network, or whatever — keep your naming conventions and infrastructure consistent and meaningful. You will save another developer or support analyst a great deal of grief, frustration, and time.

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