Expect the Unexpected with DiRT

Steve‘s article reminded me about the first time I gave my Disaster Documents presentation at a SQL Saturday.

At the end of my presentation, one attendee started an argument with me. He kept saying that paper was dead, everything was online, and there was no reason to keep hardcopy documents. I argued, what if you can’t get to your online documentation?

Not surprisingly, he gave me a poor evaluation.

The bottom line is this: even documentation needs a backup. Other than, say, getting lost in a fire, paper documents can’t break. At a minimum, have hardcopy documents that instruct how to get minimal services back up and running, and back up other recovery documentation so you can recover it later.

Voice of the DBA

Disaster recovery is one of the core tasks that many DBAs think about on a regular basis. Ensuring that we can get our data back online, available, accessible, and intact is important. More than a few DBAs that haven’t been able to recover systems, find themselves seeking new employment.

That’s not to say that most DBAs perform perfectly under pressure. Plenty make mistakes, and there may be times when they can’t recover all data. There does seem to be a correlation between how often DBAs practice recovery skills and how well they perform in an actual emergency. I know that at a few companies, we scheduled regular disaster tests, though often with simulated recovery of a systems that didn’t expect to actually take over a workload. Arguably not a good test, but better than nothing.

Google takes things a step further. They have annual, company wide, multi-day DiRT (Disaster Recovery…

View original post 359 more words

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.