Stop treating technical writing like a second-class citizen

File this under another technical writing frustration.

Imagine that you are an application developer. You finish an app for a client that you send for review. The app is clearly labeled as a “testing version,” and includes source code (yes, I know this last part doesn’t happen, but just humor me for a bit). You are meticulous with your updates, keeping track of version control and changes. You ask the client to review it and get back to you. You move on to work on other projects, forgetting about the request. A few weeks later, you remember the project, and realize that you hadn’t heard from the client. You contact them to follow up, and are chagrined to learn that not only are they using your test version app in production, they also changed the source code for what they need.

Sounds outrageous, right?

Now, substitute the following words and phrases: “technical writer” for “application developer,” “document” for “app,” “draft” for “testing version,” and “MS Word” for “source code.” Welcome to my world.

This is an actual workplace scenario that happened to me a while back, and I was reminded of this recently when the same client asked me for an MS Word version of a document (that I had sent as a PDF — I was never, ever going to send them an MS Word doc again) so they could make changes. I refused, and I told them why.

The client in question had taken my Word document — the one that I had asked them to review — and I will add that I had DRAFT stamps all over it — and were using it in their production environment. Not only that, they had made changes to it for their purposes.

Well, I found and incorporated their changes, removed the DRAFT stamps (they were obviously okay with the document), and slapped a version number on it.

I also told myself that I was never sending them a Word document ever again. They were only getting PDFs from me.

I’ll be honest. What the client did absolutely pissed me off. By “changing the document for their needs,” they completely compromised and undermined my work, they blatantly stepped on my toes, and they completely disrespected what I do.

Most of the clients I work with aren’t like this, which is why I usually don’t have a problem sending a Word document (with DRAFT stamps) out for review. Thankfully, the scenario I just described is, in my environment, the exception, not the rule. Sadly, however, there are still too many people who hold this attitude that documentation is just a side item, and treat it like a second-class citizen.

This is one of the things that drives me to do SQL Saturday talks. This is why I do my presentations. This is why I rant about poor treatment of documentation. And this is why I actively tried to leave a job.

I’ve said this time and again. Document development needs to be treated in the same way as software development. The life cycle, including version control, is no different. Not doing so undermines what documentation is. It’s a critical function in application and professional development. And as someone who has had experience in both application and documentation development, I demand: stop treating documentation like a second-class citizen.

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