When you make it hard for your customers to respond

This morning, I had an issue with my LinkedIn account. I was trying to reply to a message, and I kept getting “Send failed.” That was all I got — there were no error codes, additional information, or symptoms. I poked around LinkedIn’s Help section, and came across this page for dealing with messaging problems. I didn’t go as far as to clear my cache, but I did log out and back in, and I tried it in a different browser, all to no avail. In the middle of contacting LinkedIn’s support, the problem mysteriously “fixed itself.” If you work in tech, I don’t have to tell you how frustrating it is for an issue to mysteriously “fix itself.”

However, the issue I had, in and of itself, is not why I’m writing this article. When I heard back from LinkedIn, I got a message saying “go to this page” (the one I’d already found) and use that to troubleshoot. In response, it displayed the interface you see above. As you can see, they only gave me two options: “yes, I’m good,” and “no, I still need help.” The problem was, my response was, neither. No, I didn’t need help at that point, but I also wasn’t completely good, either. I wanted to inform them what had happened in case they wanted to investigate it further. But they did not give me that option. Between those two options, I clicked “yes, I’m good,” which immediately closed the case; I had absolutely no recourse to add more to it. I looked around for ways to send feedback, but I did not find any good way to do it. Replying to the email resulted in a response saying “you responded to an unmonitored mailbox.” The more I looked for a feedback mechanism, the more frustrated I got. The issue quickly went from “I’m reporting a technical issue” to “you guys need to fix your UI/UX.”

I’ve written before about how critical it is to get feedback, and how design can be a big deal. As much as I like LinkedIn as a business networking tool, I felt that LinkedIn fell short on both of these facets.

Let me start with the UX/UI design. I strongly felt that only those two options, especially if answering “yes” automatically closed the case, was a very poor design. As many people will tell you, the answer often isn’t simply “yes” or “no.” (One of the long-standing jokes among DBAs is that the standard DBA answer is, “it depends.”) And even after I clicked one of those buttons (in this case, I clicked “yes”), the interface was confusing. I was brought to a page that said “click to enter more information” (or something like that). The problem was, click where? None of the “links” allowed me to enter anything else, and there was no clearly logical eye path for me to follow. I had no idea what I was supposed to do once I got to that page. I kept clicking different links, trying to leave feedback. By the time I found a link, I wasn’t even sure that I was replying to my original query. I had no idea to what — or even where — I was responding.

I’ve said time and again that if you’re a technical writer — or a UX/UI developer — you don’t want to make your reader or end user work. Reading is work. Making your end user work is a sign of poor design.

Second, this experience made me question just how seriously LinkedIn takes feedback. True, nobody wants to hear bad feedback. I know I sure don’t. But if you want to improve, you need to know what it is you need to improve. How am I supposed to improve something when I don’t know what it is that I’m doing wrong? Not including a channel for feedback — or making it difficult to do so, as I allude to above — is doing a disservice to your organization and to your clients.

Good communication between you and your client is important. Not only does it help your client, it helps you improve your organization, and it builds trust between you and your customers. Making it difficult for your customers to communicate alienates them — and ends up hurting your business in the long run.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.