Support your local user group

I’m involved with a number of local groups.  I participate regularly with my local SQL Server user group and my local Albany UX group.  I occasionally attend events held by my local college alumni group.  And I hold a leadership position within the local community symphonic band with which I play.  Additionally, there are several other local groups with which I would like to be involved; only lack of time keeps me from getting involved with more of them.

Why is it important to get involved with local user groups?  There are many good reasons.

  1. It’s a free resource for learning.  Both my SQL and UX groups regularly include a presentation about some topic at their meetings.  These presentations provide me with an opportunity to learn something new.
  2. It’s an opportunity for you to get involved and to give back to the community.  I am a musician in my spare time.  My involvement with music groups give me a chance to share my talents with the rest of the world.  Likewise, I’ve become a presenter with my SQL group (more on that in a minute).  Through my user group, I have an opportunity to share my knowledge and my thoughts.
  3. It’s an opportunity to grow.  Years ago, I started attending SQL Saturday, a series of SQL-centric technical conferences that are held at various locations.  I wanted to contribute to these conferences, but I wasn’t sure how.  I gave some presentations at my local SQL group.  I took those presentations, submitted them to SQL Saturday conferences, and was accepted.  I now regularly submit to and speak at SQL Saturdays around the Northeast United States.
  4. It’s a chance to network and make new friends.  I have made a significant number of friends through my involvement with user groups.  These are people with whom I feel comfortable getting together, having dinner, inviting to parties, playing games, going to ballgames, and so on.  From a professional perspective, it’s also a great opportunity to network.  It’s entirely possible that user group involvement could lead to professional opportunities and job leads.  You never know.  Speaking of professional opportunities and job leads…
  5. It looks good on a resume.  Getting involved with user groups demonstrates that you are genuinely interested in something.  That’s something that might appeal to potential employers.
  6. You become involved with something bigger than yourself.  Doesn’t it feel good to be part of a team?  When you’re involved with a user group, you can point to it and proudly say, “I’m a part of that!”
  7. It’s fun!  I’ve often told my wife that band practice “isn’t just a hobby; it’s therapy.”  I’ve often gone to rehearsal angry about something, and by the end of rehearsal, I’ll completely forget about what it is that upset me.  These user groups are something I enjoy, and it makes for great therapy.

These are some of the reasons.  Are there any others?  Feel free to add by commenting!

So go out there, find a user group that interests you, and get involved.  Chances are that it might lead to something.  You never know!

What’s in a (team) name?

Albany once had a CBA (Continental Basketball Association) team, the Albany Patroons. They were a competitive team that had some pretty good history behind it, having produced coaches such as Phil Jackson and Bill Musselman.  I told myself that I had to go catch a game sometime.

It never happened. The very next year (after I proclaimed that I had to go to a game), the team changed their name to the Capital Region Pontiacs, after the local Pontiac dealerships.  The name change turned me off completely. I said to myself, “no way am I supporting that team.” I never made it to a game.

I liked the “Albany Patroons” name.  Wikipedia defines “patroon” as “a landholder with manorial rights to large tracts of land in the 17th century Dutch colony of New Netherland in North America.”  It was reflective of the region’s Dutch heritage, so it was appropriate.  “Capital Region Pontiacs,” on the other hand, pandered to car dealerships.  What does that have to do with Albany?!?  The new name put me off so much that I vowed never to attend a game.  As it turned out, the team ended up moving (or folding — I don’t remember which).  As far as I was concerned, good riddance.

This isn’t the only time that a team turned me off because of a name change.  I stopped rooting for the NY/NJ MetroStars when they became Red Bull New York.  (I now consider myself a fan of NYCFC.)  There was once a hockey team, the Albany Choppers (named after the local Price Chopper chain of supermarkets).  I never felt any affiliation with them.  Albany also had an independent minor league baseball team, the Diamond Dogs, and a hockey team, the River Rats.  To me, those didn’t sound like names worthy of professional sports teams in the Capital Region; rather, they sounded like gimmicks.  Although I went to a few games, I was never enamored with either team simply because of the names.  To this day, I do not have — nor do I have any desire to own — a single piece of Diamond Dogs or River Rats gear.  Today, the Capital District is home to the Tri-City ValleyCats (a single-A New York-Penn League farm team for the Houston Astros) and the Albany Devils (an AHL team affiliated with the New Jersey Devils).  To me, those names sound professional, not gimmicky, and I am more prone to support them.  (As the baseball fan that I am, I do regularly attend ValleyCats games, and I do have a few ValleyCats shirts and baseball caps.)

I don’t know if any statistics exist as to how fans react to team nicknames — whether it’s by attendance, paraphernalia sales, or what have you.  I would be curious as to what they are.  If I had to venture a guess — and that’s all this is — I’d suspect that a team’s name could affect those stats.

So for those of you who are involved with sports marketing, take heed.  What’s in a name?  Possibly everything.