Installing SQL Server 2016

In an earlier article, I discussed how to get started with SQL Server.  I mentioned downloading a copy of SQL Server Developer Edition and installing a sample database.

It had been quite some time since I performed a SQL Server installation (my current job only requires that I know T-SQL, not how to install or implement it; after all, I am a developer, not a DBA).  Additionally, I figured that having SQL Server installed on my own local machine gave me a platform on which I could practice my skills in a safe environment.  With that, I decided that I would shake off the rust and perform an installation on my own machine.  This article documents my efforts.

I’ll start by describing the platform on which I’m installing SQL Server.  I am installing this on my own laptop PC, not a server.  It might or might not be an ideal environment for running SQL Server, but it’s what I have.

  • HP ProBook 4430s laptop
  • Intel Core i5-2450M processor @ 2.50 GHz
  • Windows 10 Pro 64 bit
  • 8GB RAM
  • 325GB available disk space

I decided that I wanted to keep up with the latest version (which, at the time of this article, is SQL Server 2016), so I needed to find a copy to install on my machine.  To do that, I need to go into Visual Studio Dev Essentials.  Visual Studio Dev Essentials is free, but it does require you to create an account.  If you don’t have an account, you will be prompted to create one when you click “Join Now.”

Once your account is established (or if you already have one), you are redirected to the Visual Studio Dev Essentials page.

VSDevEss

SQL Server can be downloaded from the Downloads menu at the top of the page, as well as the Microsoft SQL Server icon under Tools.

I went to the Dev Essentials page, and saw a note that SQL Server 2016 had a critical prerequisite, so I started with downloading and installing the patch.  Select the download that matches your system (for me, it was English-United States x64.exe).  Note that this requires a restart after setup completes.  Once the patch was installed, I went ahead and downloaded SQL Server 2016.  It’s a 2.1GB download.

Once the download finished, I ran the setup.exe program, which brought me to the SQL Server Installation Center.SQLServerInstallationCenter

Clicking the Hardware and Software Requirements brought me to the corresponding page.  Reading through the requirements, I didn’t see anything that would immediately be an issue.  The only thing I saw was that it required .NET Framework 4.6, which supposedly is installed by the program.

I decided to go ahead with the installation.  After clicking the Installation tab, I clicked New SQL Server stand-alone installation or add features to an existing installation.  For the Product Key, I specified the free Developer edition, clicked Next, and followed the subsequent prompts.  I received a warning about Windows Firewall being enabled.  I opened my Settings, went into Network & Internet, and checked my Windows Firewall.  Interestingly, my Windows Firewall would not let me turn it off; it said it was controlled by Norton 360, which is installed on my computer.  This was interesting; I had no idea that Norton 360 was controlling my Windows Firewall.

For the moment, my notification regarding Windows Firewall was a warning, not a failure.  I decided to continue to see what would happen.  I went ahead and clicked Next.  This brought me to the Feature Selection window.

SQLServerFeatureSelection

I went ahead and clicked Select All.  I had no idea what features I would use, I figured that I was installing SQL Server 2016 so I could practice and learn about its features, and it would only take 8GB of disk space — considering that I have 325GB available, it’s only a drop in the bucket.

However, when I clicked Next this time, I came across an error.

PolybaseInstallFailOracle

Interesting.  Should I install the Oracle SE Java Runtime Environment or not?  To answer that question, I asked myself whether or not I needed the PolyBase Query Service for External Data.  For that matter, what, exactly, is the PolyBase Query Service?  I found my answer here.  (Note that this feature is new to SQL Server 2016.)

For the moment, I decided that I didn’t need to work with data in either Hadoop or Azure blob storage, nor did I foresee an immediate need to interface with BI tools.  If I ever come across a need for them, I figure that I could always add it later.  So I unchecked the PolyBase Query Service (for now) and decided to proceed.  (Unchecking this, by the way, brought my disk requirement down to 6.5GB.)

I went with the default named instance (MSSQLSERVER).  In fact, I pretty much went with the default configurations (the one exception being selecting Mixed Mode instead of Windows authentication mode; I did add myself as a SQL Server administrator, as well as other services configurations).

I didn’t think to keep track of how long it took to install SQL Server 2016, but I would guess it took about an hour.  SQL Server installed with no further issues.

SQL Server Management Studio 2016

For as long as I can remember, SQL Server Management Studio (SSMS) was included as a standard part of installing SQL Server.  That is not the case with SQL Server 2016; SSMS must be installed separately.  Clicking Install SQL Server Management Tools in the SQL Server Installation Center takes you to this page.  Because SSMS tends to be my go-to tool for using SQL Server, I wanted to make sure it was included with my installation.

I downloaded the SSMS .EXE file, which is 825MB.  Installing SSMS is straightforward; click Accept to accept the license agreement, and the package installs.

Other SQL Server 2016 Tools

The SQL Server Installation Center also includes support for SQL Server data tools (SSDT) and for a new R server installation.  For now, I am bypassing these tools; I will likely install them at a later date.

After all was said and done…

Once everything was installed, I opened SSMS, which ran successfully.  (One thing I’ll add is that SSMS now looks like Visual Studio, which makes sense since it is powered by the VS engine.)

I now have SQL Server 2016 installed on my machine.

What’s next?

I will be implementing Sean Lahman’s baseball database into my SQL Server.  My exploits will be documented in a future ‘blog article called “Installing a Baseball Database.”  Stay tuned!

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